Chipotle Lime Sweet Potato Fries

iGoPink Blog, Nutrition & Recipes No Comments

This recipe for Chipotle Lime Sweet Potato Fries is a healthy twist on the conventional spuds and couldn’t be easier to make. Sweet potatoes are rich in Vitamins A and C and a good source of carotenoid antioxidants, also found in carrots. This recipe is easily scaled up or down to feed a crowd or just for two.  Also makes great leftovers for morning home fries.

Chipotle Lime Sweet Potato Fries

4 pounds peeled sweet potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch wedges.

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1 t chipotle powder

1 T Maple Syrup (optional)

1/3 cup fresh lime juice

1 t celtic sea salt

Procedure:

1. Preheat oven to 400*.

2. Whisk evoo, chipotle powder, salt, lime juice, and maple syrup (if using).

3. Place potato wedges into a large bowl and toss with liquid mixture.

4. Arrange wedges in a single layer on a baking sheet.

5. Cover pan lightly and roast for thirty minutes, tossing every 10.

6. Remove foil and bake for another 10 minutes.

7.  Sprinkle chipotle powder and any additional salt, if needed, toss, and enjoy!

Happy, healthy eating!

Chef Adrianna, CHC

Adrianna Holiat is a Certified Health Coach and professionally trained Natural Foods Chef.  She is founder of Greenwich Village Green, a private health coaching practice and Baked By Bub, a natural foods line featuring organic, naturally sweetened, good-for-you baked goods.



Deciphering Organics: When to buy and what it all means

iGoPink Blog, Nutrition & Recipes No Comments

I cannot tell you how many clients ask me, “Adrianna, when should I buy organic?”, “What is Natural?”, “Is local better than organic, or is it the same thing?”

Here’s the scoop:

You don’t need to buy Certified Organic, just organically grown. Many small farms use organic practices when growing their produce but cannot afford the permits or simply have chosen not to become certified organic because of the added red tape.  Visit your local farmers market and ask the farmers what (if any) pesticides or herbicides they use.  Don’t be shy, they love talking shop with customers!

As a general rule, it’s important to buy organic fruit and veg when you plan on eating the skin. Do buy organic apples, celery, grapes, lettuce, peaches, potatoes, strawberries, tomatoes.

Some “clean” fruits and veg you don’t need to buy organic include asparagus, bananas, broccoli, cauliflower, kiwi, onions, watermelon or mangoes. It’s a safe bet to buy non-organic when a hearty skin is involved. You can visit Organic.org for a full list of the “Dirty” and “Clean” fruits and vegetables, include a free downloadable handy pocket guide!

Deciphering Labels at the store:

100% Organic: Contains 100% organic ingredients

Organic: at least 95% of ingedients are organic

Made with organic Ingredients: at least 70% organic ingredients

Some organic ingredients: less than 70% organic ingredients that must be listed separately.

The USDA also makes it clear that “natural” and “organic” are not interchangeable.  Other truthful claims such as “free range”, “hormone free”, and “natural” can still appear on food labels but do not necessarily qualify as organic.

Happy Shopping!

Chef Adrianna

Adrianna Holiat is a Certified Health Coach and professionally trained Natural Foods Chef.  She is founder of Greenwich Village Green, a private health coaching practice and Baked By Bub, a natural foods line featuring organic, naturally sweetened, good-for-you baked goods.

 



Clear Choice Orthodontic Associates Announced as Presenting Sponsor for Stiletto Sprint & Unmasking Breast Cancer Masquerade Gala

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The Woodlands, Texas (August 13, 2012): Clear Choice Orthodontic Associates has once again focused their efforts to help in the fight against breast cancer. The Breast Cancer Charities of America (BCCA) is proud to announce Clear Choice Orthodontic Associates will be the Presenting Sponsor for the 3rd Annual Stiletto Sprint (September 15 in Market Street-The Woodlands) and the Unmasking Breast Cancer Gala (October 26 at The Woodlands Waterway Marriott).

In addition to be presenting sponsors, this will be the third year that Clear Choice Orthodontic Associates has partnered with BCCA for their teeth whitening campaign. Simply go to one of seven Clear Choice locations throughout the greater Houston area and mention the teeth whitening campaign, make a financial donation to BCCA (minimum of $50) and you’ll receive free custom made teeth whitening trays and full treatment of whitening bleach (valued at over $350).

“We are honored that Clear Choice has stepped up to be the presenting sponsor for our two major events in 2012,” says BCCA Executive Director Erica Tullis. “Thank you to Dr. McLendon and his amazing staff for all they are doing to help support BCCA .They are truly helping making a difference in the lives of women with breast cancer.”

Other Stiletto Sprint sponsors include: Northside FIAT, Rico’s Mexican Grill, The Strong Firm, Radiance Advanced Skin and Body, HEB, ACI Construction, Northside Lexus, 104.1 KRBE, Tiffany & Co., Vedas Medical Spa and Wellness Center, Tommy Bahama, Langford Market, Mainstream Boutique-The Woodlands College Park and Spring Louetta, Double P Bakery, Woodlands Online, Fleet Feet, Fischer and Aniston Boutique, Community Impact Newspaper, Pure Healthy Eatery, Market Street, Corkscrew BBQ, Outback Steakhouse, Houston Community Newspapers, Chick-fil-A of The Woodlands, Crescent Moon Wine Bar, and Brooklyn Café.

Funds raised from the events as well as the teeth whitening campaign will benefit the Help Now Fund (an emergency financial assistance program that helps with rent and utilities of those who are going through breast cancer).

For more information about the organization visit: www.iGoPink.org.

Download the full Press Release

###

The Breast Cancer Charities of America (BCCA) is a non-profit organization with new global headquarters in The Woodlands, Texas. With over 25 years of experience in the non-profit industry, BCCA is dedicated to helping thousands of women through our Help Now Fund and by funding non-invasive breast cancer research.



Sprint for a (PINK) Cause!

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The Woodlands, Texas (August 13, 2012):Are you looking for a fun family event that keeps you on your toes? Grab your favorite pair of heels and race on down to Market Street!

The Breast Cancer Charities of America (BCCA) is hosting the 3rd Annual Stiletto Sprint sponsored by ClearChoice Orthodontic Associates at Market Street on Saturday, September 15, 2012. What is a Stiletto Sprint you might ask? It’s a fun, entertaining and a short distance sprint in high heels to fight against breast cancer! Everyone—men, women, and kids are welcome to join in and participate in the races.

“We are really excited to bring the Stiletto Sprint back to Market Street again this year,” says BCCA Executive Director Erica Tullis. “This is such a fun family event. We have a Kids Zone for the kids to have hands on fun sponsored by Chick-fil-A and a great Food Tent with free food for all participants from Rico’s. It’s a morning of family fun you’re not going to want to miss!”

Event activities include a Women’s Stiletto Sprint, the ever entertaining Men’s Stiletto Sprint, a non-competitive “Divas in Training” Sneaker Sprint for girls under 12, a non-competitive Sneaker Sprint for boys under 12, and a Co-Ed Sneaker Sprint for adults not quite ready to brace sprinting in 3” heels.

Check in begins at 8:00am, and the races begin at 9:00am. Funds raised will benefit the Help Now Fund (an emergency financial assistance program that helps with rent and utilities of those who are going through breast cancer). And to top of the morning, there is a fantastic and outrageous costume contest for best-dressed male and female, so remember to wear your pink and go all out!

Winners of the race receive hundreds of dollars worth of FANTASTIC prizes donated by Tiffany & Co., Tommy Bahama, Crescent Moon Wine Bar, Fleet Feet and Langford Market. So not only is it a fun sprint for a great cause, but the winners receive gift baskets of overflowing goods!

To register for the event, visit: www.StilettoSprint.com. The Stiletto Sprint is presented by ClearChoice Orthodontic Associates. Other event sponsors include: Northside FIAT, Rico’s Mexican Grill, The Strong Firm, Radiance Advanced Skin and Body Care, HEB, Corkscrew BBQ, ACI Construction, Northside Lexus, 104.1 KRBE, Tiffany & Co., Vedas Medical Spa and Wellness Center, Tommy Bahama, Langford Market, Mainstream Boutique-The Woodlands College Park and Spring Louetta, Double P Bakery, Woodlands Online, Fleet Feet, Fischer and Aniston Boutique, Community Impact Newspaper, Pure Healthy Eatery, Market Street, Outback Steakhouse, Houston Community Newspapers, Chick-fil-A of The Woodlands, Crescent Moon Wine Bar, and Brooklyn Café.

For more information on sponsorship levels contact: info@thebreastcancercharities.org

For more information about the organization please visit: www.iGoPink.org.

Download the full Press Release

###

The Breast Cancer Charities of America (BCCA) is a non-profit organization with new global headquarters in The Woodlands, Texas. With over 25 years of experience in the non-profit industry, BCCA is dedicated to helping thousands of women through our Help Now Fund and by funding non-invasive breast cancer research.



Komen Controversy: Opportunity to Examine “Life-saving Mammograms”

Breast Cancer News, iGoPink Blog No Comments

The daily news reports over the resignations of the Founder and the President of Komen for the Cure are filled with drama.  That Nancy Brinker’s life’s work seems to have been tarnished makes for compelling media.  But the best outcome of this coverage could be that America engages in a serious discussion about the dangers of breast cancer screening.

Mammography: Time for a New Screening Protocol
Despite the loud protests of many breast cancer organizations and advocacy groups, the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force got it right.  Women do not need as many mammograms as they are receiving.

In November of 2009, the Task Force updated its recommendations on breast cancer screening.  Previous standards stated that women be screened annually from the age of 40 onwards.  A furor arose over the Task Force recommendation that women between 40-49 years old should not have annual mammograms.

Overtreatment of breast cancer is epidemic, a toxic tragedy that leaves the health of hundreds-of-thousands of women compromised for the remainder of their lives.   The over-treatment starts with over-diagnosis in early screening for breast cancer—the belief that early detection is the best protection.  It is not.

Cancer screening enjoys virtually unquestioned cultural acceptance.  On the surface, the logic of screening for breast cancer seems unassailable.  A mammogram can pick up lesions as small as 0.5 cm, a size that you are seldom able to feel.  The test can detect up to 85-percent of all breast cancers.  In short, screening for breast cancer seems to make sense.

But the screening is not without significant shortcomings and health risks.  With mammography, the weak points of screening include:

  • If a woman has dense breasts, a lump is typically not visible.
  • In women under 50-years of age, at least 25-percent of the tumors will be missed.
  • In women with smaller breasts, the screening is even less accurate.

According to Dr. Susan Love, mammograms will miss cancers between 9- and 20-percent of the time.  And if nothing is found, women are given a false sense of security that all is well.

There’s more.  Approximately 5-percent of all mammograms read as positive for cancer.  Of these five, 97.5-percent will be false positives.  This means no cancer is present.  In other words, out of every 1,000 mammograms, fifty are read as positive and between one and two will actually turn out to be breast cancer.  The fact is mammograms are, for the most part, inconclusive.  Yet we treat them as the gold standard of breast cancer screening.

Early screening brings a host of related risks of which American women remain uninformed.  Radiation from routine mammography poses significant cumulative risks of initiating and promoting breast cancer.  Contrary to conventional assurances that radiation exposure from mammography is minimal and tolerable, we have known for at least forty years that the pre-menopausal breast is highly sensitive to radiation.  Each exposure increases breast cancer risk resulting in at least a cumulative 10-percent increased risk over ten years of pre-menopausal screening.

Mammography also poses a risk from breast compression.  As early as 1928, physicians were warned to handle “cancerous breasts with care for fear of accidentally disseminating cells” and spreading cancer.  Mammography requires tight and often painful compression of the breast, particularly in pre-menopausal women. Experts have warned that compression may lead to distant and lethal spread of malignant cells by rupturing small blood vessels in or around small, as yet undetected breast cancers.

Mammography’s reliability is seldom discussed by the medical providers with their patients.  These discussions must become the norm.  The message:

  1.  Missed cancers resulting in false negative readings are especially common in pre-menopausal women.  This is due to the dense and highly glandular structure of their breasts and increased proliferation late in their menstrual cycle.
  2. Missed cancers are also common in post-menopausal women on estrogen replacement therapy, as about 20 percent develop breast densities that make their mammograms as difficult to read as those of pre-menopausal women.
  3. False positive readings, which are mistakenly diagnosed cancers, are common with mammography.  Again, they are common in women on estrogen replacement therapy.  False positives result in needless anxiety, more mammograms and unnecessary biopsies.  For a woman with multiple high-risk factors, including a strong family history of breast cancer, prolonged use of contraceptives and early menarche, the cumulative risk of false positives increases to “as high as 100 percent” over a decade’s screening.

The widespread and virtually unchallenged acceptance of this early screening protocol has resulted in a dramatic increase in the diagnosis of ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS), a pre-invasive cancer.  DCIS was historically recognized as micro-calcifications.  For decades, they were considered benign but suspicious.  The screening guidance was another test in six months to determine if there were noticeable changes.

Today DCIS is widely treated as actual breast cancer.  The treatment is defended by the medical community because with current testing and diagnostic procedures, it is not possible to know if a given DCIS may become malignant or if it will disappear.  Some 80-percent of all DCIS never become invasive even if left untreated. Furthermore, the breast cancer mortality from DCIS is the same, approximately 1-percent, both for women diagnosed and treated early and for those diagnosed later following the development of invasive cancer.  Early detection of DCIS does not reduce mortality.  This fact is startling and seems counterintuitive.  But the data speaks the truth.

A Clarion Call:  New Screening Guidelines
Studies do show that screening mammography does reduce the death rate in women over 50 years of age by approximately 30-percent.  Early detection in this age group works.  However, equal results are available from much less-invasive and non-toxic clinical breast examinations coupled with breast self-exams.

What is more worrisome are new studies which show that in women under 50, screening mammography can increase the death rate from breast cancer by up to 50-percent.  The suspected reason is because these women accumulate radiation toxicity.  Even more, other studies show screening mammography leads to more frequent diagnosis and aggressive treatment of breast cancer.  These same studies also show aggressive screening and treatment does not decrease overall breast cancer mortality.

America clearly needs new breast cancer screening guidelines.  Below is a wise approach widely accepted in countries other than the United States for women under 50-years old:

  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct thorough breast self-examination.  Perform it on the first day of menstruation.
  • Schedule a mammogram only if needed for diagnosis of a suspected lump.  Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle.

For women over 50-years old:

  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct thorough breast self-examination.  Schedule it on the first day of your period if you are still menstruating.
  • Schedule a mammogram if you discover a suspicious change in the feel of your breast.  Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle if you are still menstruating.
  • Employ mammography screening every other year.

Annual clinical breast examination combined with monthly breast self-examination is a safe and effective alternative to mammography.  That most breast cancers are first recognized by women themselves was admitted in 1985 by the American Cancer Society, the leading advocate of routine mammography for all women over the age of 40.  “We must keep in mind the fact that at least 90-percent of the women who develop breast carcinoma discover the tumors themselves”  Furthermore, as previously shown, “training increases reported breast self-examination frequency, confidence, and the number of small tumors found.”

A pooled analysis of several studies showed that women who regularly performed breast self-examinations detected their cancers much earlier and with fewer positives nodes and smaller tumors than women failing to examine themselves.  Plus breast self examinations also enhance earlier detection of missed cancers, especially in pre-menopausal women.

Let’s be clear.  The effectiveness of breast self-exam critically depends on careful training by skilled professionals.  Further, confidence in self-exams is enhanced with annual clinical breast examinations by an experienced professional using structured individual training.  And finally, this strategy requires discipline.  Every year, a clinical breast exam; every month, a breast self-exam.  If a woman cannot or will not meet that standard of discipline, the entire process stands in jeopardy.

The question of more screening extends to what have come to be known as the “breast cancer genes,” BRCA1 (BReast CAncer gene one) and BRCA2 (BReast CAncer gene two). Women who inherit a mutation in either of these genes have a higher-than-average risk of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

The function of the BRCA genes is to keep breast cells growing normally and prevent any cancer cell growth.  When these genes contain the mutations that are passed from generation to generation, they do not function normally and breast cancer risk increases. Abnormal BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes may account for between 5 and 10-percent of all breast cancers.

Should you choose to undergo genetic testing to find out your status? A genetic test involves giving a blood sample that can be analyzed to pick up any abnormalities in these genes.  Testing for these abnormalities is not done routinely, but it may be considered on the basis of your family history and personal situation.  But remember that most people who develop breast cancer have no family history of the disease.

Do mammograms save lives?  The answer is very, very few.  But the massive over-diagnosis and overtreatment they initiate makes routine mammography a very real health hazard.  Were mammograms an automobile, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration would have recalled them years ago.  A less-is-more breast cancer screening protocol must replace our current policy.  This is the first necessary shift in the evolving integrated breast cancer care model.  Current annual mammography guidelines are exposing nearly all American women to exceedingly high levels of radiation.  It’s part of the toxic tragedy that is making us sicker—and poorer.



Household Cleaning products may increase Cancer Risk

Breast Cancer News, iGoPink Blog No Comments

Despite the pink KFC buckets, fund-raising walks, and early-detection campaigns surrounding the issue, doctors and scientists still have very few clues about what exactly causes breast cancer. While the evidence suggests that a poor diet and lack of exercise play a strong role, there have been few studies looking at environmental factors such as water pollution and industrial chemicals.

A new study suggests this oversight needs correcting. Researchers from the Silent Spring Institute, a Boston-based nonprofit dedicated to studying the link between breast cancer and the environment, recently published a study in the journal Environmental Health that strongly hints at a connection between the disease and the household cleaning products we use every day.

The anti-cancer diet you should be on.

THE DETAILS: The study authors used data collected from a long-running study of women living on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, between 1988 and 1995. The study group included 787 women who’d been diagnosed with breast cancer and 721 women who had not. All the women were asked standard lifestyle questions related to family history of breast cancer, diet, exercise, and socioeconomic status, as well as questions about the participants’ use of several classes of cleaning products, including solid and spray air fresheners, surface cleaners, oven cleaners, and mold and mildew products.

Turns out that breast cancer was twice as prevalent in women who reported using the highest amounts of all cleaning products, compared to women who reported using the lowest amounts. Looking at the data another way, women who reported using air fresheners and mold/mildew products were at higher risk of having breast cancer, especially those who used solid air fresheners and mold cleaners containing bleach. Surface and oven cleaners didn’t appear to increase breast cancer risk.

WHAT IT MEANS: The main point of the study was to show that the chemicals used in cleaning products, many of which are untested for safety, require closer scrutiny, says lead author Julia Brody, PhD, director of the Silent Spring Institute. “This is the very first look at the link between these chemicals and breast cancer in humans,” she says. One of the questions asked during each interview was whether the women believed that chemicals could contribute to cancer. Interestingly, the subgroup of women who had had breast cancer and who said that chemicals contribute “a lot” also reported some of the highest levels of cleaning-product use.

But the reason the researchers chose to look at cleaning products in the first place, says Brody, is because strong laboratory evidence shows that many endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) used in cleaning products mimic estrogen, and have caused breast cancer cells to proliferate. “We’re interested in the chemicals that mimic estrogen because estrogen is a known breast cancer risk factor,” she says. Air fresheners contain a variety of EDCs, including synthetic musks and phthalates. Mold and mildew cleaners contain EDCs such as triclosan (the primary ingredient in antibacterial cleaning products), phthalates, and petroleum-based surfactants (which help cleaners penetrate grime).

All these chemicals are easily avoidable, says Brody. “With cleaning products, it’s easy to use soap, water, baking soda, and vinegar, and you should choose fragrance-free products as well,” she says. But don’t stop there. “It’s very important for people to become involved in advocating for safer cleaning products,” believes Brody.

4 Ways to clean your house without polluting your air.

Here are some key safety and advocacy tips regarding household cleaning products:

Call your congressmen
The Safe Chemicals Act of 2010 was just introduced into the House of Representatives and would require companies to adopt the “better safe than sorry” approach—meaning premarket safety testing—rather than the “innocent until proven guilty” rule they now apply. Call your representatives and senators and urge them to support the bill.

Use up your existing supply…
Continue to use whatever cleaning products you have on hand, says Brody, then replace them with safer alternatives when you run out.

…Then learn to make safe, nontoxic cleaners
When you need more cleaners, don’t waste money on premade products when safer alternatives easily made from baking soda, vinegar, lemon juice, and even vodka are cheaper and just as effective to use. Click here for Rodale.com’s recipes for inexpensive, nontoxic cleaning products:

  • Almost Everything Cleaner
  • Mold and Mildew Cleaner
  • Natural Air Fresheners
  • Tile Cleaner
  • Window Cleaner
  • Oven Cleaner
  • Scouring Powders

Despite the pink KFC buckets, fund-raising walks, and early-detection campaigns surrounding the issue, doctors and scientists still have very few clues about what exactly causes breast cancer. While the evidence suggests that a poor diet and lack of exercise play a strong role, there have been few studies looking at environmental factors such as water pollution and industrial chemicals.

A new study suggests this oversight needs correcting. Researchers from the Silent Spring Institute, a Boston-based nonprofit dedicated to studying the link between breast cancer and the environment, recently published a study in the journal Environmental Health that strongly hints at a connection between the disease and the household cleaning products we use every day.

The anti-cancer diet you should be on.

THE DETAILS: The study authors used data collected from a long-running study of women living on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, between 1988 and 1995. The study group included 787 women who’d been diagnosed with breast cancer and 721 women who had not. All the women were asked standard lifestyle questions related to family history of breast cancer, diet, exercise, and socioeconomic status, as well as questions about the participants’ use of several classes of cleaning products, including solid and spray air fresheners, surface cleaners, oven cleaners, and mold and mildew products.

Turns out that breast cancer was twice as prevalent in women who reported using the highest amounts of all cleaning products, compared to women who reported using the lowest amounts. Looking at the data another way, women who reported using air fresheners and mold/mildew products were at higher risk of having breast cancer, especially those who used solid air fresheners and mold cleaners containing bleach. Surface and oven cleaners didn’t appear to increase breast cancer risk.

WHAT IT MEANS: The main point of the study was to show that the chemicals used in cleaning products, many of which are untested for safety, require closer scrutiny, says lead author Julia Brody, PhD, director of the Silent Spring Institute. “This is the very first look at the link between these chemicals and breast cancer in humans,” she says. One of the questions asked during each interview was whether the women believed that chemicals could contribute to cancer. Interestingly, the subgroup of women who had had breast cancer and who said that chemicals contribute “a lot” also reported some of the highest levels of cleaning-product use.

But the reason the researchers chose to look at cleaning products in the first place, says Brody, is because strong laboratory evidence shows that many endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) used in cleaning products mimic estrogen, and have caused breast cancer cells to proliferate. “We’re interested in the chemicals that mimic estrogen because estrogen is a known breast cancer risk factor,” she says. Air fresheners contain a variety of EDCs, including synthetic musks and phthalates. Mold and mildew cleaners contain EDCs such as triclosan (the primary ingredient in antibacterial cleaning products), phthalates, and petroleum-based surfactants (which help cleaners penetrate grime).

All these chemicals are easily avoidable, says Brody. “With cleaning products, it’s easy to use soap, water, baking soda, and vinegar, and you should choose fragrance-free products as well,” she says. But don’t stop there. “It’s very important for people to become involved in advocating for safer cleaning products,” believes Brody.

4 Ways to clean your house without polluting your air.

Here are some key safety and advocacy tips regarding household cleaning products:

Call your congressmen
The Safe Chemicals Act of 2010 was just introduced into the House of Representatives and would require companies to adopt the “better safe than sorry” approach—meaning premarket safety testing—rather than the “innocent until proven guilty” rule they now apply. Call your representatives and senators and urge them to support the bill.

Use up your existing supply…
Continue to use whatever cleaning products you have on hand, says Brody, then replace them with safer alternatives when you run out.

…Then learn to make safe, nontoxic cleaners
When you need more cleaners, don’t waste money on premade products when safer alternatives easily made from baking soda, vinegar, lemon juice, and even vodka are cheaper and just as effective to use. Click here for Rodale.com’s recipes for inexpensive, nontoxic cleaning products:

  • Almost Everything Cleaner
  • Mold and Mildew Cleaner
  • Natural Air Fresheners
  • Tile Cleaner
  • Window Cleaner
  • Oven Cleaner
  • Scouring Powders

Article Courtesy of http://health.yahoo.net



Blueberries: A Low-Calorie, Family-Friendly Superfood!

iGoPink Blog, Nutrition & Recipes No Comments

In season now, flavorful and juicy blueberries are a great source of antioxidants. Antioxidants combat free radical damage in our bodies that may lead to Cancer, Alzheimer’s and other maladies.  One serving of blueberries, about a cup, is just 84 calories, a great source of fiber, contains 25% of your recommended daily allowance (RDA) of Vitamin C, and with a low glycemic index (GI), is even considered a diabetic friendly fruit.

Tip from the Pro:  When you plan on eating thin skinned fruits, like blueberries, peaches, and apples I recommend buying organic whenever possible! You don’t want to undo the antioxidant power by ingesting pesticides sprayed on conventional produce.

Blueberries make a great raw snack, are a wonderful addition to smoothies, or even Sunday morning pancakes!  Wild blueberries are also readily available in the frozen fruit isle of your local grocery store.

To Your Health!

Chef Adrianna, CHC

Adrianna Holiat is a Certified Health Coach and professionally trained Natural Foods Chef.  She is founder of Greenwich Village Green, a private health coaching practice and Baked By Bub, a natural foods line featuring organic, naturally sweetened, good-for-you baked goods.