Healthy and Affordable Meals Can Change your Life!

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Eating healthy doesn’t have to eat at your credit card bill also.  At Breast Cancer Charities of America it’s common to hear comments from breast cancer patients of, “I wish I could afford to eat healthy…it’s so expensive.”  Well this week, we’re talking about great ways to eat clean and healthy with affordable meals that won’t break the bank.

One of the best ways to start this off with is remembering WHAT is clean and healthy eating.Vegitable display in a market  Best way we remind folks…shop the perimeter of the store.  Think about it…on the outer edges of the store are where you find the FRESH veggies, the FRESH fruit, the bakery fresh breads (and yes, the ice cream isle too but we’ll forget about that one….everything in moderation is what we say!)  But for the most part the outside walls of your local grocery store have the things that are fresh, aren’t filled with preservatives and are great for your diet.

Next step in this is getting creative in your cooking and planning ahead.  Fresh food may be a few dollars more than the processed/pre-packaged food, but it will most certainly save on your long term medical bills due to your health!  Try planning a weeks worth of healthy meals ahead of time.  Take for example how far (and great tasting) BBQ chicken in the slow cooker can go.

  • Monday:  BBQ Chicken served with corn on the cob and sweet potatoes sprinkled with honey and cayenne pepper
  • Tuesday:  Left over BBQ Chicken shredded up over a romaine lettuce salad topped with black beans, corn, a diced tomato, green onions and cilantro topped with a simple olive oil or balsamic vinaigrette
  • Wednesday:  Left over BBQ Chicken shredded up on top of a whole wheat pizza crust topped with BBQ sauce…add red onion slices, low fat mozzarella cheese, cilantro and even a sprinkle of feta cheese (we promise you won’t have any leftovers!)
  • Thursday: Take any leftover chicken you may have (and freeze in between the time from cooking it to keep it fresh) and have a homemade family taco night.  Purchase from the bakery whole wheat tortillas, top with BBQ chicken, grilled red onions, bell peppers and cheddar cheese and you’ll love what a fun BBQ taco tastes like

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Right there…you have four easy, healthy and enjoyable meals for your family….and to top it off, they’re extremely affordable.

Remember, you always have the ability to control what you eat!  We constantly hear the saying “you are what you eat”…so eat healthy!  Eat clean…get your family involved in making smart decisions.  As we constantly say, “eat a plant!”…can’t go wrong there!  Make healthy eating fun and your family will thank you for years to come!

 



The 10 Most Cancer Causing Foods

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The statement “everything causes cancer” has become a popular hyperbole, and one that some people use as rhetorical fodder to excuse their own dietary and lifestyle failures, particularly as they pertain to cancer risk. But the truth of the matter is that many common food items have, indeed, been scientifically shown to increase cancer risk, and some of them substantially. Here are 10 of the most unhealthy, cancer causing foods that you should never eat again:

 

 

1) Genetically-modified organisms (GMOs)1

It goes without saying that GMOs have no legitimate place in any cancer-free diet, especially now that both GMOs and the chemicals used to grow them have been shown to cause rapid tumor growth. But GMOs are everywhere, including in most food derivatives made from conventional corn, soybeans, and canola. However, you can avoid them by sticking with certified organic, certified non-GMO verified, and locally-grown foods that are produced naturally without biotechnology.

 

 

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2) Processed meats

Most processed meat products, including lunch meats, bacon, sausage, and hot dogs, contain chemical preservatives that make them appear fresh and appealing, but that can also cause cancer. Both sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate have been linked to significantly increasing the risk of colon and other forms of cancer, so be sure to choose only uncured meat products made without nitrates, and preferably from grass-fed sources.

 

 

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3) Microwave popcorn

They might be convenient, but those bags of microwave popcorn are lined with chemicals that are linked to causing not only infertility but also liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognizes the perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in microwave popcorn bag linings as “likely” carcinogenic, and several independent studies have linked the chemical to causing tumors. Similarly, the diacetyl chemical used in the popcorn itself is linked to causing both lung damage and cancer.

 

 

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4) Soda pop

Like processed meats, soda pop has been shown to cause cancer as well. Loaded with sugar, food chemicals, and colorings, soda pop acidifies the body and literally feeds cancer cells. Common soda pop chemicals like caramel color and its derivative 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) have also specifically been linked to causing cancer.

 

 

 

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5) ‘Diet’ foods, beverages

Even worse than conventional sugar-sweetened soda pop, though, is “diet” soda pop and various other diet beverages and foods. A recent scientific review issued by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) of more than 20 separate research studies found that aspartame, one of the most common artificial sweeteners, causes a range of illnesses including birth defects and cancer. Sucralose (Splenda), saccharin and various other artificial sweeteners have also been linked to causing cancer.

 

 

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6) Refined ‘white’ flours

Refined flour is a common ingredient in processed foods, but its excess carbohydrate content is a serious cause for concern. A study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Mile Markers, and Prevention found that regular consumption of refined carbohydrates was linked to a 220 percent increase in breast cancer among women. High-glycemic foods in general have also been shown to rapidly raise blood sugar levels in the body, which directly feeds cancer cell growth and spread.

 

 

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7) Refined sugars

The same goes for refined sugars, which tend to rapidly spike insulin levels and feed the growth of cancer cells. Fructose-rich sweeteners like high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) are particularly offensive, as cancer cells have been shown to quickly and easily metabolize them in order to proliferate. And since cookies, cakes, pies, sodas, juices, sauces, cereals, and many other popular, mostly processed, food items are loaded with HFCS and other refined sugars, this helps explain why cancer rates are on the rise these days.

 

 

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8) Conventional apples, grapes, and other ‘dirty’ fruits

Many people think they are eating healthy when they buy apples, grapes, or strawberries from the store. But unless these fruits are organic or verified to be pesticide-free, they could be a major cancer risk. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) found that up to 98 percent of all conventional produce, and particularly the type found on its “dirty” fruits list, is contaminated with cancer-causing pesticides.

 

 

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9) Farmed salmon

Farmed salmon is another high-risk cancer food, according to Dr. David Carpenter, Director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University of Albany. According to his assessment, farmed salmon not only lacks vitamin D, but it is often contaminated with carcinogenic chemicals, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), flame retardants, pesticides, and antibiotics.

 

 

 

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10) Hydrogenated oils

They are commonly used to preserveprocessed foods and keep them shelf-stable. But hydrogenated oils alter the structure and flexibility of cell membranes throughout the body, which can lead to a host of debilitating diseases such as cancer. Some manufacturers are phasing out the use of hydrogenated oils and replacing them with palm oil and other safer alternatives, but trans fats are still widely used in processed foods. –

 

 

Source: Natural News


Whole Grains: Weed Out Imposter Ingredients

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Want to curb your risk of cancer and other diseases? Eating whole grains with every meal can help.

That’s because whole grains are loaded with fiber, vitamins, minerals and natural plant compounds. These compounds help protect your cells from damage that can lead to cancer. Added bonus: the fiber found in whole grains helps you stay full longer, maintain a healthy weight, and keep your cholesterol and blood sugar at normal levels.

But not all grains do the trick. Only grains that haven’t been processed contain the whole grain kernel — and offer all the disease-fighting perks you get from eating whole grains.

Unfortunately, finding whole grains can be a little tricky because many foods include ingredients that sound like whole grains but aren’t.

So, how can you tell what foods are actually whole grains? Below, we break down what to look for.

grains-nutrition-webLook for the word “Whole”

Grocery store shelves are filled with grains and grain products. Those include whole grains, multi-grains, seven-grain, bran, whole wheat and stone-ground products.

But only those that include the word “whole” — whole grains and whole wheat — are actually whole grains. That’s true whether you’re looking at a package for whole wheat pasta or whole wheat bread.

Multi-grains, seven-grain, bran and wheat products usually do have some health perks. So, don’t skip them altogether. Just don’t expect them to provide your daily fill of whole grains.

After all, the grains in these foods have been refined, which destroys the grain’s nutrient-rich, cancer-fighting outer layer. And, even when food manufacturers “enrich” these grains, they don’t restore the full health benefits of whole grains.

 

Get to know other whole grains

Keep in mind that many whole grains don’t actually include “whole” or even “grains” in their name. Here are some common ingredients and foods that are great sources of whole grains:

  • Bulgur wheat
  • Buckwheat
  • Barley, preferably hulled
  • Cornmeal, preferably whole graingrains, ingredients
  • Kasha
  • Millet
  • Oats
  • Oat bran
  • Oatmeal
  • Quinoa
  • Wild or brown rice
  • Tabouleh
  • Whole rye
  • Whole wheat

 Choose foods with the Whole Grain Stamp

NEW WG stamp ver. 3.AI

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s an easy way to spot whole grains: look for a golden Whole Grain Stamp on the food package. There are actually two versions of the Whole Grain Stamp.

  • The 100% Stamp says “100%” across the stamp. It only appears on products where all grain ingredients are whole grains.  Products with this stamp contain at least 16 grams of whole grain per serving.
  • The Basic Stamp does not say “100%.” Foods with this stamp contain at least 8 grams (a half-serving) of whole grain, but they also may include some refined grains, such as extra bran, germ or refined flour.

Choose whole grains listed at the top of the label’s ingredient list

Choosing a product with one or more ingredients? Whenever possible, pick items that list the whole grain ingredients first.

That’s because an item that lists, say, quinoa as the first ingredient contains far more cancer-fighting whole grains than a food that lists quinoa (or any other whole grain) last.

Include whole grains in every meal

Want to reap the cancer-fighting benefits of whole grains? Your best bet is to make them part of every meal.

 

We hope you enjoyed this article as much as we did! It was written by Laura Nathan-Garner with MD Anderson.
See the original article HERE!



10 Ways to Get Your Daily Vitamin D

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Here at The Breast Cancer Charities of America, we love to educate on breast cancer prevention. One fact that we tell women is researchers have found that women, who are vitamin D deficient, have a 222% increased risk for developing breast cancer.  It’s important to get your daily dose of vitamin D, so here are 10 ways to do just that!

11. Sunlight

Sunlight spurs the body to make vitamin D. But because of the skin-cancer risk, there isn’t an official recommendation to catch some rays. However, a small amount of sun exposure without sunscreen can do the trick.

“If you’re going to get it from the sun, about 20 to 25 minutes of exposure is helpful,” says Stephen Honig, MD, director of the Osteoporosis Center at the Hospital for Joint Diseases, in New York City. The sun is less likely to provide your daily needs at higher latitudes, in the winter, or if you’re older or dark skinned (skin pigment blocks light and the process is less efficient with age). And FYI: Light through a window won’t work.

22. Fatty fish

Fatty fish can be a good source of vitamin D. Common options include salmon, trout, mackerel, tuna, and eel. 

A 3-ounce sockeye salmon fillet contains about 450 international units (IUs) of vitamin D—a good portion of the 600 IUs that is the Institute of Medicine’s recommended dietary allowance (800 IUs if you’re over 70). 

And you get a bonus—heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids!

33. Canned tuna fish

Fresh fish aren’t the only way to boost your vitamin D intake; you can get vitamin D from a can, too. 

Canned tuna fish and canned sardines both contain vitamin D, and are usually less expensive than fresh fish. 

Plus, a longer shelf life makes the canned products easy to stock up on and use at your leisure. Canned light tuna has the most vitamin D—about 150 IUs per 4 ounces—while canned albacore tuna has about 50 IUs per 4 ounces, and canned sardines have a little more than 40 IUs per two sardines.

44. Certain mushrooms

Just like humans, mushrooms have the capacity to produce vitamin D when exposed to ultraviolet light. 

Mushrooms, however, are usually grown in the dark and don’t contain the vitamin. Specific brands, however, are grown in ultraviolet light to spur vitamin D production. 

Check to see if vitamin D–rich ‘shrooms, like Dole’s Portobello Mushrooms, are available at a store near you. They’re perfect for vegetarians looking for plant-based foods that contain the vitamin. Dole’s portobellos will give you 400 IUs of vitamin D per 3-ounce serving (about 1 cup of diced mushrooms).

55. Fortified milk

Almost all types of cow’s milk in the U.S. are fortified with vitamin D, but ice cream and cheese are not. 

In general, an 8-ounce glass of milk contains at least 100 IUs of vitamin D, and a 6-ounce serving of yogurt contains 80 IUs, but the amount can be higher (or lower) depending on how much is added.

Some soy and rice milks are fortified with about the same amount, but check the label since not all contain vitamin D.

66. Some types of orange juice

Not a dairy fan? No problem. You can get vitamin D from fortified orange juice. 

One 8-ounce glass of fortified juice usually has around 100 IUs of vitamin D, but the amount varies from brand to brand. Not all brands are fortified, so check the label. 

Two fortified brands, Florida Natural Orange Juice and Minute Maid Kids+ Orange Juice, contain 100 IUs per 8-ounce serving.

77. Supplements

Vitamin D supplements can help you get your proper daily dose, and as Dr. Honig points out, you don’t run into the issue of skin cancer as you might with UV rays. “And it’s not like calcium,” he says. “You don’t have to split up your vitamin D dose; you can take it all at one time.” 

Too much vitamin D can be toxic, however. The IOM sets the upper limit at 4,000 IUs for people aged 9 and older. That includes all sources—food, sun, and supplements. 

Talk to your doctor before choosing a dosage.

88. Egg Yolks

Eggs are a convenient way to get vitamin D. They’re popular in many breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert recipes. Since the vitamin D in an egg comes from its yolk, it’s important to use the whole egg—not just the whites. One yolk will give you about 40 IUs, but don’t try to get your daily vitamin D just from eggs. One egg contains about 200 milligrams of cholesterol, and the American Heart Association recommends consuming no more than 300 milligrams a day for heart health.

99. Fortified Cereal

If you’re a vitamin D seeker looking for a crunch, look no further than fortified cereals. Choose a low-calorie fortified cereal like Multi Grain Cheerios to get part of your daily fill of vitamin D. You can pair it with fortified milk and a glass of fortified OJ too. A 1-cup (29 gram) serving of Multi Grain Cheerios with one-half cup of fortified milk is 90 IUs; add in an 8-ounce glass of fortified orange juice, and your total is close to 200 IUs.

1010. Cod Liver Oil

While its name might suggest a less-than-savory flavor, cod liver oil is often flavored with mint or citrus, or comes in capsule form. One tablespoon contains about 1,300 IUs of vitamin D, which is more than twice the recommended dietary allowance of 600 IUs per day. That amount doesn’t exceed the maximum upper-level intake of 4,000 IUs for people over 8 years old, but it exceeds the daily maximum for infants (1,000 IUs).           Read the original article by Ella Quittner here!