New Dietary Guidelines On Cancer Prevention!

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Reading about the latest cancer – fighting nutrition guidelines and tips can feel like a daunting task at times considering the vast amount of information that is easily available at the click of a button in the virtual age that we live in now. There’s irony to be found here in the fact that as soon as we put down the article that we’re reading about how terrible butter is for us, there’s a new published study claiming that there’s heart-healthy benefits to consuming butter.

We live in a world that offers answers at the click of a button, but maneuvering these murky waters is the difficult part. Recently a new article was published in the Houston Chronicle about “cancer – busting, dietary guidelines are more stringent.” This article presents a new paper by Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, advocating for minimal alcohol, and red-meat consumption, as well as other limiting dietary factors.

Dr. Barnard is quick to acknowledge that there are few absolutes in the field of nutrition, however his new findings come at a time that Americans are recovering from their “holiday binges,” post – 4th of July. Dr. Barnard’s new dietary guidelines on cancer prevention are interesting and worthwhile considering, since the information presented may come as previously known knowledge by others.

Dr. Barnard’s finding and the article itself are well written and provide a 2-sided argument to these new dietary guidelines. If you’d like to read the full article, we think you’ll gain a thing or two from it, so check it out!

Read more about the article!

 

 



9 Surprising Health Benefits of Tomatoes

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Tomatoes! They’re sweet, juicy, and delicious. Everyone knows they are good for you, right? Uh, yeah, sure. Does everyone know specifically why tomatoes are a healthful food? Ummm… They have vitamin C? They’re low in calories? They’re fat-free? Yes, yes, and yes, but that’s not all!

Let’s look at what makes the tomato an excellent healthy choice.

Tomatoes 101

One serving of red, ripe, raw tomatoes (one cup or 150 grams) is a good source of Vitamins A, C, K, folate and potassium. Tomatoes are naturally low in sodium, saturated fat, cholesterol, and calories. Tomatoes also provide thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, magnesium, phosphorus and copper, all of which are necessary for good health.

On top of that, one serving of tomatoes gives you 2 grams of fiber, which is 7% of the daily recommended amount. Tomatoes also have a relatively high water content, which makes them a filling food. In general eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes, confers protection against high blood pressure, high cholesterol, strokes, and heart disease.

One tomato packs one powerful punch of nutrition, but there’s much more!

Healthy Skin

Tomatoes make your skin look great. Beta-carotene, also found in carrots and sweet potatoes, helps protect skin against sun damage. Tomatoes’ lycopene also makes skin less sensitive to UV light damage, a leading cause of fine lines and wrinkles.

Strong Bones

Tomatoes build strong bones.The vitamin K and calcium in tomatoes are both very good for strengthening and repairing bones.

 Lycopene also has been shown to improve bone mass, which is a great way to fight osteoporosis.

Fight Cancer

Tomatoes are a natural cancer fighter. Lycopene (again!) can reduce the risk of several cancers, including prostate, cervical, mouth, pharynx, throat, esophagus, stomach, colon, rectal, prostate and ovarian cancer. Tomatoes’ antioxidants (vitamins A and C) fight the free radicals which can cause cell damage

Blood Sugar

Tomatoes can keep your blood sugar in balance. Tomatoes are a very good source of chromium, which helps to regulate blood sugar.

Vision

Tomatoes can improve your vision. The vitamin A that tomatoes provide can improve vision and help prevent night blindness. Recent research shows that consuming tomatoes may help reduce the risk of macular degeneration, a serious and irreversible eye condition.

Hair

Tomatoes will even make your hair look better.The vitamin A found in tomatoes works to make hair strong and shiny. (Sorry, tomatoes cannot help much with thinning hair—but they will make the hair you have look better!)

Prevent Kidney Stones and Gallstones

Tomatoes can help prevent kidney stones and gallstones. Some studies suggest that kidney and gall stones are less likely to form in people who eat tomatoes without the seeds.

Chronic Pain

Tomatoes can reduce chronic pain. If you are one of the millions of people who deal with mild to moderate chronic pain (such as from arthritis or back pain), tomatoes may be a pain-buster. Tomatoes are high in bioflavonoids and carotenoids, which are known anti-inflammatory agents.

Chronic pain often involves chronic inflammation, so attacking the inflammation is a good way to fight the chronic pain. (Many commercial drugs that fight pain are actually anti-inflammatory drugs.)

Lose Weight

Tomatoes can help you lose weight. If you are on a sensible diet and exercise plan, build lots of tomatoes into your everyday eating. They make a great snack and can be used to “bulk up” salads, casseroles, sandwiches and other meals. Because tomatoes contain lots of water and fiber, they are what Weight Watchers calls a “filling food,” one of those foods that fills you up fast without adding a lot of calories or fat.

TOMO

Easy Ways to Eat More Tomatoes

· Add sliced tomatoes to sandwiches—from tuna to turkey

· Chop tomatoes in salad (leave them at room temperature, if possible)

· Use marinara or tomato sauces (canned, cooked, or homemade) on pasta; this can be big calorie savings when you swap out creamy sauces for tomato-based sauces

· Drink tomato juice or vegetable juice with tomatoes

· Tomatoes for breakfast? Top scrambled eggs with coarsely chopped tomatoes or add them to a breakfast taco

· Eat tomatoes as a mid-afternoon snack (my father used to eat them like an apple—but you can use a knife and fork)

· Make a tomato sandwich—this is a sandwich that stars the tomato. The classic dressing for this sandwich is mayonnaise, but I know some people who like tomatoes and mustard

· Add canned or stewed tomatoes to soups and stews, like vegetable soup or beef stew

· Serve stewed tomatoes over a baked potato (also great on mashed potatoes)

· Make your own salsa with lots of fresh tomato—salsa is a great replacement for high-fat salad dressings as well as being tasty on meats, fish, and eggs

 

Read the original article here.



7 Summer Salad Ideas

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Fresh salads can be a light and healthy choice for the summer. Here are seven summer salad ideas to make your summer a little healthier!
SunflowerSeed Salad

Arugula, Grape, and Sunflower Seed Salad

By including a variety of ingredients, salads are often a nutritional powerhouse: This recipe provides lots of antioxidants from the grapes, healthy fats and vitamin E from the sunflower seeds and grapeseed oil, and folate and vitamin A from the arugula. A sweet mustard vinaigrette dressing matches both the peppery bitterness of the greens and the sweet juiciness of the grapes. Try this salad topped with salmon or tuna for a healthful dinner.View Recipe: Arugula, Grape, and Sunflower Seed Salad 

TunaGarbanzo

Tuna-Garbanzo Salad

With fresh green beans, hearty garbanzos, and a smoky-creamy dressing, this Spanish tapas-style dish is unlike any other tuna salad you’ve tried. But it still takes less than 10 minutes to make and contains fewer than 400 calories per serving. High-quality tuna is a must; check European or Mediterranean markets for imported oil-packed tuna.View Recipe: Tuna-Garbanzo SaladProscuitto