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Can “the Pill” give you Cancer?

The Birth Control Pill and Breast Cancer Risk

Since the early 1960s, birth control pills have become the most popular and one of the most effective forms of birth control used in the U.S. But an association between estrogen and an increased risk of breast cancer has led to a continuing debate about the role birth control pills may play in developing breast cancer.

For most women, especially young women, experts say the benefits of birth control pills far outweigh the risk. But here are some frequently asked questions and answers about the controversy.

What Is Your Cancer Risk? Take the WebMD Cancer Health Check
Does Taking Birth Control Pills Increase My Risk of Developing Breast Cancer?
Maybe. Studies that have examined the use of oral contraceptives as a risk factor for breast cancer have produced conflicting results. Some researchers think this might be due to the fact that the level of hormones in birth control pills has changed since they were first studied. Early birth control pills contained much higher levels of hormones than today’s low-dose pills.

Scandinavian researchers have noted an increase in breast cancer in a group of women that were currently taking or had recently taken birth control pills. Longer use of the pill seemed to increase the risk. Similar research found that 10 years or more after women stopped using birth control pills, their breast cancer risk returned to the same level as if they had never used birth control pills.

However, another reputable study by Women’s Contraceptive and Reproductive Experience (Women’s CARE) done between 1994 and 1998 showed there was no increased risk of breast cancer in current or former users of birth control pills.

In general, most studies have not found an overall increased risk of breast cancer due to the use of oral contraceptives.

My Family Has a History of Breast Cancer. Should I Take Birth Control Pills?
Maybe. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women with a strong family history of breast cancer may have up to an 11 times higher risk of breast cancer if they have ever taken the pill. But experts caution that the study involved mainly women who took birth control pills prior to 1975, when it contained much higher levels of the hormones estrogen and progestin than today’s lower-dose pill.

Those with a family history of breast cancer related to mutations in the BRCA genes should use caution before taking birth control pills. Families at increased risk of breast cancer who are carriers of alterations in these genes may further increase their risk of breast cancer by taking birth control pills. Recent studies show taking birth control pills did not increase the risk in women who are carriers of the abnormal form of the BRCA2 gene, but did in those with the altered BRCA1 gene.

Women should discuss their family history of cancer with their doctor when evaluating the risks and benefits of using birth control pills.

Courtesy of www.webmd.com

Baked Pasta with Sausage, tomatoes & cheese

 

Becky Luigart-Stayner; Jan Gautro

This easy, cheesy pasta recipe features ziti, turkey sausage, canned tomatoes, and fresh basil. It’s a perfect pasta dish for busy weeknights.

 

Yield:  8 servings (serving size: 1 1/2 cups)

 

1 (1-pound) package uncooked ziti (short tube-shaped pasta)
1 pound hot turkey Italian sausage links
1 cup chopped onion
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 (14.5-ounce) cans petite-diced tomatoes, undrained
1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
Cooking spray
1 cup (4 ounces) shredded fresh mozzarella cheese
1 cup (4 ounces) grated fresh Parmesan cheese

 

 

Preheat oven to 350°.

Cook pasta according to package directions, omitting salt and fat. Drain the pasta, and set aside.

Remove casings from sausage. Cook sausage, onion, and garlic in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until browned, stirring to crumble. Add the tomato paste, salt, pepper, and tomatoes, and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Combine cooked pasta, sausage mixture, and basil. Place half of the pasta mixture in a 4-quart casserole coated with cooking spray. Top with half of mozzarella and half of Parmesan. Repeat layers. Bake at 350° for 25 minutes or until bubbly.

 

CALORIES 413 (26% from fat); FAT 11.8g (sat 6.1g,mono 2.2g,poly 1g); IRON 7.9mg; CHOLESTEROL 49mg; CALCIUM 265mg; CARBOHYDRATE 53g; SODIUM 941mg; PROTEIN 24.1g; FIBER 4.5g

 

Help Now Fund Info


If you are a breast cancer patient who is in need of financial assistance with rent or utilities while you are undergoing treatment, look no further.

Please fill out a Help Now Fund application and have your SOCIAL WORKER or NURSE send us the application!  If you qualify we will pay up to $500 of your rent or utility bills!

NOTE: Applications submitted by patients themselves will not be accepted.

We will start accepting the September applications from September 1 -7.

Get your application HERE!




PRESS Forward Against Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Charities of America (BCCA) exists for one reason—to eliminate breast cancer as a life-threatening disease.  Our central focus is on educating, empowering and encouraging all women to become pro-active in preventing breast cancer and, if diagnosed, in surviving breast cancer.

We offer leading edge, state-of-the-art, research-backed programs that focus on all that women can do in addition to medical care.  Our services include nutrition, exercise, and social support all the while defusing the fear that often accompanies breast cancer.  And we provide help now with emergency financial assistance to medicines and medical supplies to women in poverty.

Join Breast Cancer Charities as we P-R-E-S-S Forward in the fight against breast cancer….

Prevention

Studies show that 8 of 10 breast cancers can be prevented.   Prevention—not just early detection.  Breast cancer prevention is the new frontier.  Excellent studies show that prevention is possible.  We lead the way with our Vitamin D Promise program.

Research

Though the “New Era Cancer Research Fund” we underwrite less-toxic, minimally-invasive diagnosis and treatment options.  This includes research on topics such as the link between Vitamin D and a reduction in cancer; how food choices impact your body during treatment and studies on Proton Therapy as a first-line treatment.

Education

Education is power in preventing and surviving breast cancer.  From teaching breast self exams to wise exercise, from managing post-treatment side-effects to mobilizing the mind for healing, we guide and support women to actively participate in health and healing.  Our University Education Program teaches students the lifestyle choices they can make at an early age to prevent breast cancer.

Survival

BCCA’s integrated cancer care program supports and complements conventional medical treatment.  The program encompasses the whole person—body, mind and spirit.  While accomplished in addition to conventional medical care, we understand it takes more than medicine to get well and stay well.

Support

When breast cancer strikes, it impacts the entire family and all areas of their life, especially financially.  We have designed our Help Now Fund to assist with the basic needs of cancer patients in need.  The demand is huge and we limit our funding to past-due rents and utilities.  Our commitment: no woman will go through breast cancer without a roof over her head and the basics of daily needs.

 

We PRESS Forward in the fight against breast cancer.  We inspire hope.  We nurture healing.  We renew life.

The Breast Cancer Charities of America.  We are the new voice of breast cancer.  We are passionate, filled with energy and a vision.  And we will not stop until breast cancer is no longer a life-threatening disease.

Join us.  Make your voice heard.  It’s a new day in the world of breast cancer.

Behind The Curtain At BCCA!

front entrance

Today we thought it would be fun to bring you a “Behind the scenes” type of look at BCCA’s motto and inspirational mission. The Breast Cancer Charities of America, better known as “BCCA” was founded in 2009. For the past 4 years we have continued to grow and flourish within our local community and beyond. Our most recent event, the Pink 5k was a tremendous success, and we ended up raising significantly more than we had projected! As we prepare and look towards our other future events, we’re reminded of our mission here.  Our mission at BCCA is shown  below:

 

Mission Statement

The Breast Cancer Charities of America exists to eliminate breast cancer as a life-threatening illness.  We bring together organizations representing all health and social service disciplines in the commitment to establish new and unprecedented levels of effectiveness in research, education, advocacy and support.  BCCA is the only non-profit bringing the ‘integrated cancer care’ message to women of America.

For us, as a team we have chosen to make it our daily mission to be the difference in someone’s life and work towards a goal of someday eliminating breast cancer as a life-threatening illness. At BCCA we do this with our motto, PRESS Forward.

Prevention

Research

Education

Survival

Support

Every day that PRESS forward in the fight against breast cancer, puts us 1 step closer to the finish line. We love knowing that our work here makes a difference and with our small, but mighty staff we know that we can conquer the world together and eliminate breast cancer someday!

 

 

Wine Women & Shoes – Key to the Closet!

Wine…women…and shoes, what could be more fabulous than these things combined into a one-night-only event? Then mark your calendars and grab your girlfriends!

The Breast Cancer Charities of America (BCCA) is pleased to announce they have been selected as the Houston charity partner for ‘Wine, Women, and Shoes’, a national wine-savvy, shoe-loving fundraising event coming to The Woodlands on September 25, 2014 at The Woodlands Waterway Marriott.

WW&S, now in its tenth year, is a national event that partners with select non-profit organizations to bring an unforgettable experience that promises to deliver a fashionably fun evening. The event will feature ‘The Marketplace’ with exclusive designers from Beverly Hills, Miami and New York flying in to showcase and provide a wonderful shopping experience. In addition, nine elite vineyards from Northern California will be on site providing wine from the country’s top winemakers and the evening will be capped off with a New York style runway fashion show.

KTTC

Key to the Closet

Key to the closet is an activity that will be taking place at Wine, Women, and Shoes. Key to the closet will feature a wardrobe containing clothes, accessories, and handbags from Trina Turk and other designers. The wardrobe will be valued at $5,000+. To enter for a chance at this exciting wardrobe selection a woman can purchase a ticket online for $50 prior to the evening or at the event for the same price.

>>> Buy your ticket now! <<<

When a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer, it affects every aspect of her life, especially how she views and dresses herself. Breast cancer patients and survivors often struggle with body transformations. Going through this life impacting illness changes how a woman feels and the clothes that she chooses to adorn herself in. For most women getting ready in the morning is second nature and something that does not require much additional thought. Yet for a breast cancer patient or survivor this once simple task can seem daunting and difficult. At this event the “key to the closet” is symbolic for us in the sense that it symbolizes a way in which we can give back to women in need.

The proceeds from every ticket purchased will go directly back into BCCA to reinvest in the women that feel passionate about helping. Purchase a “key” today for your chance to win and in the process you’ll be helping a woman that is going through breast cancer cope with her body images.

 

>>> Buy your ticket now! <<<

General Admission tickets are $95 and VIP Tickets for $120. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit WineWomenandShoes.com/Houston or call 936.231.8460. Be There. Be Fabulous!

 

 

Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin B9 (Folate)

Vitamin B9 (aka: folate) is a water-soluble B vitamin with many rich natural sources. Folic acid is the synthetic form of vitamin B9 found in fortified foods and supplements. As with most vitamins, the natural form of vitamin B9 (folate) is preferred, and better for absorption. Vitamin B9 (folate) is required for numerous body functions including DNA synthesis and repair, cell division, and cell growth. A deficiency of folate can lead to anemia in adults, and slower development in children. For pregnant women, folate is especially important for proper fetal development. Folate, Vitamin B9, is a water soluble vitamin that is well regulated by the body, thus overdose is rare in natural food sources, and can only occur from supplements. The current DV for Folate (Vitamin B9) is 400μg.

 

1

#1: Beans (Black Eyed Peas – Cooked)

Folate in 100g Per cup (171g) Per ounce (28g)
208µg (52% DV) 356µg (89% DV) 58µg (15% DV)

Other Beans High in Folate (%DV per cup cooked): Mung Beans (80%), Pinto Beans (74%), Chickpeas (71%), Pink Beans (71%), Lima Beans (68%), Black Beans (64%), Navy Beans (64%), and Kidney Beans (58%)

2

#2: Lentils (Cooked)

Folate in 100g Per cup (198g) Per tablespoon (12g)
181µg (45% DV) 358µg (90% DV) 22µg (5% DV)

Half a cup of cooked lentils contains 115 calories and less than half a gram of fat.

3

#3: Spinach (Raw)

Folate in 100g Per cup (30g) Per cup (Cooked – 180g)
194µg (49% DV) 58µg (15% DV) 263µg (66% DV)

Other Dark Green Leafy Vegetables High in Folate (%DV per cup cooked): Turnip Greens (42%), Pak Choi (Chinese Cabbage)(17%), Savoy Cabbage (17%), and Collard Greens (8%).

4

#4: Asparagus (Cooked)

Folate in 100g Per 1/2 cup (90g) Per 4 spears (60g)
149µg (37% DV) 134µg (34% DV) 89µg (22% DV)

5

#5: Lettuce (Cos or Romaine)

Folate in 100g Per 3oz Serving (85g) Per cup (Shredded – 47g)
136µg (34% DV) 116µg (29% DV) 64µg (16% DV)

Other Lettuce High in Folate (%DV per cup shredded): Endive (18%), Butterhead (10%), Salad Cress (10%), Chicory (8%), and Arugula (4%).

6

#6: Avocado 

Folate in 100g Per cup cubed (150g) Per avocado (201g)
81µg (20% DV) 122µg (30% DV) 163µg (41% DV)

Half an avocado contains 161 calories.

7
#7: Broccoli (Cooked)

Folate in 100g Per 1/2 cup chopped (78g) Per stalk (180g)
108µg (27% DV) 84µg (21% DV) 194µg (49% DV)

Other Brassica Vegetables High in Folate (%DV per cup cooked):Chinese Broccoli (22%), Broccoli Raab (15%), and Cauliflower (14%).

8

#8: Tropical Fruits (Mango)

Folate in 100g Per cup (Pieces – 165g) Per fruit (336g)
43µg (11% DV) 71µg (18% DV) 145µg (36% DV)

Other Tropical Fruit High in Folate (%DV per fruit): Pomegranate (27%), Papaya (15%), Guava (7%), Kiwi (7%), and Banana (6%).

9

#9: Oranges

Folate in 100g Per cup segments (180g) Per orange (121g)
39µg (10% DV) 70µg (18% DV) 47µg (12% DV)

A cup of orange juice provides 19% DV for folate.

10

#10: Bread (Wheat Bread)

Folate 100g Per slice (29g) Per ounce (28g)
85µg (21% DV) 25µg (6% DV) 24µg (6% DV)

Other Bread High in Folate (%DV per slice): French Bread (24%), Italian Bread (14%), Wheat Germ Bread (8%).

 

Read the original article here.

New Dietary Guidelines On Cancer Prevention!

Reading about the latest cancer – fighting nutrition guidelines and tips can feel like a daunting task at times considering the vast amount of information that is easily available at the click of a button in the virtual age that we live in now. There’s irony to be found here in the fact that as soon as we put down the article that we’re reading about how terrible butter is for us, there’s a new published study claiming that there’s heart-healthy benefits to consuming butter.

We live in a world that offers answers at the click of a button, but maneuvering these murky waters is the difficult part. Recently a new article was published in the Houston Chronicle about “cancer – busting, dietary guidelines are more stringent.” This article presents a new paper by Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, advocating for minimal alcohol, and red-meat consumption, as well as other limiting dietary factors.

Dr. Barnard is quick to acknowledge that there are few absolutes in the field of nutrition, however his new findings come at a time that Americans are recovering from their “holiday binges,” post – 4th of July. Dr. Barnard’s new dietary guidelines on cancer prevention are interesting and worthwhile considering, since the information presented may come as previously known knowledge by others.

Dr. Barnard’s finding and the article itself are well written and provide a 2-sided argument to these new dietary guidelines. If you’d like to read the full article, we think you’ll gain a thing or two from it, so check it out!

Read more about the article!

 

 

9 Surprising Health Benefits of Tomatoes

Tomatoes! They’re sweet, juicy, and delicious. Everyone knows they are good for you, right? Uh, yeah, sure. Does everyone know specifically why tomatoes are a healthful food? Ummm… They have vitamin C? They’re low in calories? They’re fat-free? Yes, yes, and yes, but that’s not all!

Let’s look at what makes the tomato an excellent healthy choice.

Tomatoes 101

One serving of red, ripe, raw tomatoes (one cup or 150 grams) is a good source of Vitamins A, C, K, folate and potassium. Tomatoes are naturally low in sodium, saturated fat, cholesterol, and calories. Tomatoes also provide thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, magnesium, phosphorus and copper, all of which are necessary for good health.

On top of that, one serving of tomatoes gives you 2 grams of fiber, which is 7% of the daily recommended amount. Tomatoes also have a relatively high water content, which makes them a filling food. In general eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes, confers protection against high blood pressure, high cholesterol, strokes, and heart disease.

One tomato packs one powerful punch of nutrition, but there’s much more!

Healthy Skin

Tomatoes make your skin look great. Beta-carotene, also found in carrots and sweet potatoes, helps protect skin against sun damage. Tomatoes’ lycopene also makes skin less sensitive to UV light damage, a leading cause of fine lines and wrinkles.

Strong Bones

Tomatoes build strong bones.The vitamin K and calcium in tomatoes are both very good for strengthening and repairing bones.

 Lycopene also has been shown to improve bone mass, which is a great way to fight osteoporosis.

Fight Cancer

Tomatoes are a natural cancer fighter. Lycopene (again!) can reduce the risk of several cancers, including prostate, cervical, mouth, pharynx, throat, esophagus, stomach, colon, rectal, prostate and ovarian cancer. Tomatoes’ antioxidants (vitamins A and C) fight the free radicals which can cause cell damage

Blood Sugar

Tomatoes can keep your blood sugar in balance. Tomatoes are a very good source of chromium, which helps to regulate blood sugar.

Vision

Tomatoes can improve your vision. The vitamin A that tomatoes provide can improve vision and help prevent night blindness. Recent research shows that consuming tomatoes may help reduce the risk of macular degeneration, a serious and irreversible eye condition.

Hair

Tomatoes will even make your hair look better.The vitamin A found in tomatoes works to make hair strong and shiny. (Sorry, tomatoes cannot help much with thinning hair—but they will make the hair you have look better!)

Prevent Kidney Stones and Gallstones

Tomatoes can help prevent kidney stones and gallstones. Some studies suggest that kidney and gall stones are less likely to form in people who eat tomatoes without the seeds.

Chronic Pain

Tomatoes can reduce chronic pain. If you are one of the millions of people who deal with mild to moderate chronic pain (such as from arthritis or back pain), tomatoes may be a pain-buster. Tomatoes are high in bioflavonoids and carotenoids, which are known anti-inflammatory agents.

Chronic pain often involves chronic inflammation, so attacking the inflammation is a good way to fight the chronic pain. (Many commercial drugs that fight pain are actually anti-inflammatory drugs.)

Lose Weight

Tomatoes can help you lose weight. If you are on a sensible diet and exercise plan, build lots of tomatoes into your everyday eating. They make a great snack and can be used to “bulk up” salads, casseroles, sandwiches and other meals. Because tomatoes contain lots of water and fiber, they are what Weight Watchers calls a “filling food,” one of those foods that fills you up fast without adding a lot of calories or fat.

TOMO

Easy Ways to Eat More Tomatoes

· Add sliced tomatoes to sandwiches—from tuna to turkey

· Chop tomatoes in salad (leave them at room temperature, if possible)

· Use marinara or tomato sauces (canned, cooked, or homemade) on pasta; this can be big calorie savings when you swap out creamy sauces for tomato-based sauces

· Drink tomato juice or vegetable juice with tomatoes

· Tomatoes for breakfast? Top scrambled eggs with coarsely chopped tomatoes or add them to a breakfast taco

· Eat tomatoes as a mid-afternoon snack (my father used to eat them like an apple—but you can use a knife and fork)

· Make a tomato sandwich—this is a sandwich that stars the tomato. The classic dressing for this sandwich is mayonnaise, but I know some people who like tomatoes and mustard

· Add canned or stewed tomatoes to soups and stews, like vegetable soup or beef stew

· Serve stewed tomatoes over a baked potato (also great on mashed potatoes)

· Make your own salsa with lots of fresh tomato—salsa is a great replacement for high-fat salad dressings as well as being tasty on meats, fish, and eggs

 

Read the original article here.

7 Summer Salad Ideas

Fresh salads can be a light and healthy choice for the summer. Here are seven summer salad ideas to make your summer a little healthier!
SunflowerSeed Salad

Arugula, Grape, and Sunflower Seed Salad

By including a variety of ingredients, salads are often a nutritional powerhouse: This recipe provides lots of antioxidants from the grapes, healthy fats and vitamin E from the sunflower seeds and grapeseed oil, and folate and vitamin A from the arugula. A sweet mustard vinaigrette dressing matches both the peppery bitterness of the greens and the sweet juiciness of the grapes. Try this salad topped with salmon or tuna for a healthful dinner.View Recipe: Arugula, Grape, and Sunflower Seed Salad 

TunaGarbanzo

Tuna-Garbanzo Salad

With fresh green beans, hearty garbanzos, and a smoky-creamy dressing, this Spanish tapas-style dish is unlike any other tuna salad you’ve tried. But it still takes less than 10 minutes to make and contains fewer than 400 calories per serving. High-quality tuna is a must; check European or Mediterranean markets for imported oil-packed tuna.View Recipe: Tuna-Garbanzo SaladProscuitto