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Let’s Talk About Breast Cancer

commitment-cardAre you going through breast cancer or have been recently diagnosed with breast cancer and need some hope and inspiration to keep you going on the right track to health and wellness? Scroll through Next Steps  to get help with talking to your family, figuring out which questions to ask, and more about the surviving  breast cancer.

Take a moment to download your own Health and Wellness Commitment Card

Did you know?

1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer

A healthy diet & exercise routine can reduce your chance for breast cancer by nearly 40%

When caught early, breast cancer has a 98% survival rate

Nearly 85% of women diagnosed with breast cancer DO NOT have a family history

Over 2 Million women in the US have been diagnosed and treated for breast cancer

Know the symptoms of breast cancer

Early breast cancer usually doesn’t cause symptoms. But as the tumor grows, it can change how the breast looks or feels.

  • A lump or thickening in or near the breast or in the underarm area
  • A change in the size or shape of the breast
  • Dimpling or puckering in the skin of the breast
  • A nipple turned inward into the breast
  • Discharge (fluid) from the nipple, especially if it’s bloody
  • Scaly, red, or swollen skin on the breast or nipple
  • The skin may have pitting so that it looks like an orange

These symptoms do not automatically indicate breast cancer. But, if you have any of these conditions, you should tell your health care provider so that the problems can be diagnosed and treated.

Knowing Your Body:

For women under 50-years old:

  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination. We recommend you schedule it on or near your birthday.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct thorough breast self-examination. We recommend you schedule it on the first day of menstruation.
  • Schedule a mammogram only if needed for diagnosis of a suspected lump. Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle.
  • In addition, you may wish to employ annual thermography screening between the ages of 30 and 50.
  • If you are between the ages of 20 and 30, consider a thermogram every two years in addition to your monthly breast self-examinations.

For women over 50-years old:

  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination. We recommend you schedule it on or near your birthday.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct a thorough breast self-examination. We recommend you schedule it on the first day of your period if you are still menstruating.
  • Schedule a mammogram if you discover a lump. Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle if you are still menstruating.
  • Employ mammography screening every other year.
  • Consider thermography screening on alternate years.
  • If a positive result comes back from the thermogram, schedule a mammogram.

Steps to help you respond with maximum intelligence to this diagnosis and help you rebuild your self-healing functions.

The basic action points are:

  1. Examine. Step back from the day-to-day pressures of your life to evaluate your current situation in its entirety.
  2. Discover. Assess both current life issues that must be changed as well as future needs that must be met.
  3. Plan. Create a simple plan to restore health and total well-being.
  4. Implement. Work in partnership with health advisors who have your confidence. Begin a self-care plan to create whole-person well-being.
  5. Review. Conduct quarterly reviews of your progress, making adjustments as necessary.

Taken together, these action points will play the central role in mobilizing all your healing options and capacities, both external and internal.

The Breast Cancer Prevention Lifestyle
Yes, you can maximize your potential for actually preventing breast cancer! It’s all about personal choices in how we take care of ourselves.

Let’s talk nutrition! Making wise nutritional choices is one of the best defenses against breast cancer. Visit our Nutrition page for more healthy tips!

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