New Dietary Guidelines On Cancer Prevention!

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Reading about the latest cancer – fighting nutrition guidelines and tips can feel like a daunting task at times considering the vast amount of information that is easily available at the click of a button in the virtual age that we live in now. There’s irony to be found here in the fact that as soon as we put down the article that we’re reading about how terrible butter is for us, there’s a new published study claiming that there’s heart-healthy benefits to consuming butter.

We live in a world that offers answers at the click of a button, but maneuvering these murky waters is the difficult part. Recently a new article was published in the Houston Chronicle about “cancer – busting, dietary guidelines are more stringent.” This article presents a new paper by Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, advocating for minimal alcohol, and red-meat consumption, as well as other limiting dietary factors.

Dr. Barnard is quick to acknowledge that there are few absolutes in the field of nutrition, however his new findings come at a time that Americans are recovering from their “holiday binges,” post – 4th of July. Dr. Barnard’s new dietary guidelines on cancer prevention are interesting and worthwhile considering, since the information presented may come as previously known knowledge by others.

Dr. Barnard’s finding and the article itself are well written and provide a 2-sided argument to these new dietary guidelines. If you’d like to read the full article, we think you’ll gain a thing or two from it, so check it out!

Read more about the article!

 

 



The 10 Most Cancer Causing Foods

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The statement “everything causes cancer” has become a popular hyperbole, and one that some people use as rhetorical fodder to excuse their own dietary and lifestyle failures, particularly as they pertain to cancer risk. But the truth of the matter is that many common food items have, indeed, been scientifically shown to increase cancer risk, and some of them substantially. Here are 10 of the most unhealthy, cancer causing foods that you should never eat again:

 

 

1) Genetically-modified organisms (GMOs)1

It goes without saying that GMOs have no legitimate place in any cancer-free diet, especially now that both GMOs and the chemicals used to grow them have been shown to cause rapid tumor growth. But GMOs are everywhere, including in most food derivatives made from conventional corn, soybeans, and canola. However, you can avoid them by sticking with certified organic, certified non-GMO verified, and locally-grown foods that are produced naturally without biotechnology.

 

 

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2) Processed meats

Most processed meat products, including lunch meats, bacon, sausage, and hot dogs, contain chemical preservatives that make them appear fresh and appealing, but that can also cause cancer. Both sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate have been linked to significantly increasing the risk of colon and other forms of cancer, so be sure to choose only uncured meat products made without nitrates, and preferably from grass-fed sources.

 

 

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3) Microwave popcorn

They might be convenient, but those bags of microwave popcorn are lined with chemicals that are linked to causing not only infertility but also liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognizes the perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in microwave popcorn bag linings as “likely” carcinogenic, and several independent studies have linked the chemical to causing tumors. Similarly, the diacetyl chemical used in the popcorn itself is linked to causing both lung damage and cancer.

 

 

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4) Soda pop

Like processed meats, soda pop has been shown to cause cancer as well. Loaded with sugar, food chemicals, and colorings, soda pop acidifies the body and literally feeds cancer cells. Common soda pop chemicals like caramel color and its derivative 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) have also specifically been linked to causing cancer.

 

 

 

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5) ‘Diet’ foods, beverages

Even worse than conventional sugar-sweetened soda pop, though, is “diet” soda pop and various other diet beverages and foods. A recent scientific review issued by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) of more than 20 separate research studies found that aspartame, one of the most common artificial sweeteners, causes a range of illnesses including birth defects and cancer. Sucralose (Splenda), saccharin and various other artificial sweeteners have also been linked to causing cancer.

 

 

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6) Refined ‘white’ flours

Refined flour is a common ingredient in processed foods, but its excess carbohydrate content is a serious cause for concern. A study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Mile Markers, and Prevention found that regular consumption of refined carbohydrates was linked to a 220 percent increase in breast cancer among women. High-glycemic foods in general have also been shown to rapidly raise blood sugar levels in the body, which directly feeds cancer cell growth and spread.

 

 

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7) Refined sugars

The same goes for refined sugars, which tend to rapidly spike insulin levels and feed the growth of cancer cells. Fructose-rich sweeteners like high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) are particularly offensive, as cancer cells have been shown to quickly and easily metabolize them in order to proliferate. And since cookies, cakes, pies, sodas, juices, sauces, cereals, and many other popular, mostly processed, food items are loaded with HFCS and other refined sugars, this helps explain why cancer rates are on the rise these days.

 

 

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8) Conventional apples, grapes, and other ‘dirty’ fruits

Many people think they are eating healthy when they buy apples, grapes, or strawberries from the store. But unless these fruits are organic or verified to be pesticide-free, they could be a major cancer risk. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) found that up to 98 percent of all conventional produce, and particularly the type found on its “dirty” fruits list, is contaminated with cancer-causing pesticides.

 

 

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9) Farmed salmon

Farmed salmon is another high-risk cancer food, according to Dr. David Carpenter, Director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at the University of Albany. According to his assessment, farmed salmon not only lacks vitamin D, but it is often contaminated with carcinogenic chemicals, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), flame retardants, pesticides, and antibiotics.

 

 

 

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10) Hydrogenated oils

They are commonly used to preserveprocessed foods and keep them shelf-stable. But hydrogenated oils alter the structure and flexibility of cell membranes throughout the body, which can lead to a host of debilitating diseases such as cancer. Some manufacturers are phasing out the use of hydrogenated oils and replacing them with palm oil and other safer alternatives, but trans fats are still widely used in processed foods. –

 

 

Source: Natural News


10 Ways to Get Your Daily Vitamin D

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Here at The Breast Cancer Charities of America, we love to educate on breast cancer prevention. One fact that we tell women is researchers have found that women, who are vitamin D deficient, have a 222% increased risk for developing breast cancer.  It’s important to get your daily dose of vitamin D, so here are 10 ways to do just that!

11. Sunlight

Sunlight spurs the body to make vitamin D. But because of the skin-cancer risk, there isn’t an official recommendation to catch some rays. However, a small amount of sun exposure without sunscreen can do the trick.

“If you’re going to get it from the sun, about 20 to 25 minutes of exposure is helpful,” says Stephen Honig, MD, director of the Osteoporosis Center at the Hospital for Joint Diseases, in New York City. The sun is less likely to provide your daily needs at higher latitudes, in the winter, or if you’re older or dark skinned (skin pigment blocks light and the process is less efficient with age). And FYI: Light through a window won’t work.

22. Fatty fish

Fatty fish can be a good source of vitamin D. Common options include salmon, trout, mackerel, tuna, and eel. 

A 3-ounce sockeye salmon fillet contains about 450 international units (IUs) of vitamin D—a good portion of the 600 IUs that is the Institute of Medicine’s recommended dietary allowance (800 IUs if you’re over 70). 

And you get a bonus—heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids!

33. Canned tuna fish

Fresh fish aren’t the only way to boost your vitamin D intake; you can get vitamin D from a can, too. 

Canned tuna fish and canned sardines both contain vitamin D, and are usually less expensive than fresh fish. 

Plus, a longer shelf life makes the canned products easy to stock up on and use at your leisure. Canned light tuna has the most vitamin D—about 150 IUs per 4 ounces—while canned albacore tuna has about 50 IUs per 4 ounces, and canned sardines have a little more than 40 IUs per two sardines.

44. Certain mushrooms

Just like humans, mushrooms have the capacity to produce vitamin D when exposed to ultraviolet light. 

Mushrooms, however, are usually grown in the dark and don’t contain the vitamin. Specific brands, however, are grown in ultraviolet light to spur vitamin D production. 

Check to see if vitamin D–rich ‘shrooms, like Dole’s Portobello Mushrooms, are available at a store near you. They’re perfect for vegetarians looking for plant-based foods that contain the vitamin. Dole’s portobellos will give you 400 IUs of vitamin D per 3-ounce serving (about 1 cup of diced mushrooms).

55. Fortified milk

Almost all types of cow’s milk in the U.S. are fortified with vitamin D, but ice cream and cheese are not. 

In general, an 8-ounce glass of milk contains at least 100 IUs of vitamin D, and a 6-ounce serving of yogurt contains 80 IUs, but the amount can be higher (or lower) depending on how much is added.

Some soy and rice milks are fortified with about the same amount, but check the label since not all contain vitamin D.

66. Some types of orange juice

Not a dairy fan? No problem. You can get vitamin D from fortified orange juice. 

One 8-ounce glass of fortified juice usually has around 100 IUs of vitamin D, but the amount varies from brand to brand. Not all brands are fortified, so check the label. 

Two fortified brands, Florida Natural Orange Juice and Minute Maid Kids+ Orange Juice, contain 100 IUs per 8-ounce serving.

77. Supplements

Vitamin D supplements can help you get your proper daily dose, and as Dr. Honig points out, you don’t run into the issue of skin cancer as you might with UV rays. “And it’s not like calcium,” he says. “You don’t have to split up your vitamin D dose; you can take it all at one time.” 

Too much vitamin D can be toxic, however. The IOM sets the upper limit at 4,000 IUs for people aged 9 and older. That includes all sources—food, sun, and supplements. 

Talk to your doctor before choosing a dosage.

88. Egg Yolks

Eggs are a convenient way to get vitamin D. They’re popular in many breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert recipes. Since the vitamin D in an egg comes from its yolk, it’s important to use the whole egg—not just the whites. One yolk will give you about 40 IUs, but don’t try to get your daily vitamin D just from eggs. One egg contains about 200 milligrams of cholesterol, and the American Heart Association recommends consuming no more than 300 milligrams a day for heart health.

99. Fortified Cereal

If you’re a vitamin D seeker looking for a crunch, look no further than fortified cereals. Choose a low-calorie fortified cereal like Multi Grain Cheerios to get part of your daily fill of vitamin D. You can pair it with fortified milk and a glass of fortified OJ too. A 1-cup (29 gram) serving of Multi Grain Cheerios with one-half cup of fortified milk is 90 IUs; add in an 8-ounce glass of fortified orange juice, and your total is close to 200 IUs.

1010. Cod Liver Oil

While its name might suggest a less-than-savory flavor, cod liver oil is often flavored with mint or citrus, or comes in capsule form. One tablespoon contains about 1,300 IUs of vitamin D, which is more than twice the recommended dietary allowance of 600 IUs per day. That amount doesn’t exceed the maximum upper-level intake of 4,000 IUs for people over 8 years old, but it exceeds the daily maximum for infants (1,000 IUs).           Read the original article by Ella Quittner here!



Founder of Cancer Recovery Foundation Responds to World Cancer Report 2014

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Greg Anderson, Founder & CEO of Cancer Recovery Foundation International, Responds to World Cancer Report 2014

The new World Cancer Report issued by the World Health Organization (WHO), recently predicted worldwide cancer rates to rise by 57 percent in the next two decades.  The report used its strongest language ever to highlight the problem including the dire prediction of “an imminent human disaster” if we do not act.WorldCancerReport

The report issued a sobering warning:  “We cannot treat our way out of the cancer problem. More commitment to prevention and early detection is desperately needed in order to complement improved treatments and address the alarming rise in cancer burden globally.”

The global burden of cancer is the single most important reason why the Cancer Recovery Foundation Group of charities, including Breast Cancer Charities of America and Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation maintain a major commitment to medical missions through their International Aid programs.

The organizations’ medical missions program distributes cancer treatment medicines, cancer diagnostic and treatment equipment as well as ancillary medical supplies to mission hospitals globally.  Recent recipients include cancer treatment centers in Guatemala, Honduras, Grenada, Kenya, Ghana, Liberia, DR Congo, Zambia, Zimbabwe, The Philippines and Viet Nam.

“We believe we are our brothers (and sisters) keepers,” said Greg Anderson.  “When we began our work, we clearly stated our mission was to help ALL people prevent and survive cancer.  Our International Aid program fulfills that mission mandate.”

The World Cancer Report said the growing cancer burden disproportionately impacts developing nations—the very countries that have the least resources to respond to the problem.  Approximately 60 percent of the world’s cancer cases and approximately 70 percent of the world’s cancer death occur in Africa, Asia, Central and South America.

“This is exactly why we are committed to helping in this way,” said Anderson.  More information on how The Breast Cancer Charities of America helps, visit their website.



Proton Therapy: New Less Toxic Treatment for Early Stage Breast Cancer

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Proton Therapy is a relatively newer form of cancer treatment. It has shown remarkable promise and advantages over conventional therapy in the treatment of breast cancer.

Proton radiation therapy is non-invasive treatment that offers a low-risk option for early breast cancer patients. It has less impact on the healthy tissue near the tumor site that is being treated with the proton therapy. This is because the proton goes directly in to the tumor with pinpoint precision and stays within the tumor. This is unlike traditional therapies that have an exit point. Compared to traditional radiation, proton therapy does not leave any burn marks and does not cause any cosmetic or tissue damage.

ProtonTherapy

Image Credit: University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

Researchers and physicians stress that proton therapy is not a replacement for a lumpectomy but rather a less toxic path of treatment afterwards. At a proton therapy center, the average breast cancer patient will receive a 30 minute to 1 hour per day for a total of 10 days of proton treatment on an outpatient basis. Compared to radiation and/or chemotherapy which require at least 5 to 7 weeks of treatment, proton therapy allows the patient a faster approach to treatment.
Other strong points for Proton Therapy leading the way as a new treatment are:

  • Treatment offers faster recovery time with minimal side effects
  • Pain-less for most patients
  • Little to no hair loss
  • Proton radiation has little to no impact on patient energy levels

Currently in the United States there are 12 Proton Therapy Centers with several more in the planning stages at leading treatment hospitals and facilities.
Current operating centers include:



PRESS Forward Against Breast Cancer

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Breast Cancer Charities of America (BCCA) exists for one reason—to eliminate breast cancer as a life-threatening disease.  Our central focus is on educating, empowering and encouraging all women to become pro-active in preventing breast cancer and, if diagnosed, in surviving breast cancer.

We offer leading edge, state-of-the-art, research-backed programs that focus on all that women can do in addition to medical care.  Our services include nutrition, exercise, and social support all the while defusing the fear that often accompanies breast cancer.  And we provide help now with emergency financial assistance to medicines and medical supplies to women in poverty.

Join Breast Cancer Charities as we P-R-E-S-S Forward in the fight against breast cancer….

Prevention

Studies show that 8 of 10 breast cancers can be prevented.   Prevention—not just early detection.  Breast cancer prevention is the new frontier.  Excellent studies show that prevention is possible.  We lead the way with our Vitamin D Promise program.

Research

Though the “New Era Cancer Research Fund” we underwrite less-toxic, minimally-invasive diagnosis and treatment options.  This includes research on topics such as the link between Vitamin D and a reduction in cancer; how food choices impact your body during treatment and studies on Proton Therapy as a first-line treatment.

Education

Education is power in preventing and surviving breast cancer.  From teaching breast self exams to wise exercise, from managing post-treatment side-effects to mobilizing the mind for healing, we guide and support women to actively participate in health and healing.  Our University Education Program teaches students the lifestyle choices they can make at an early age to prevent breast cancer.

Survival

BCCA’s integrated cancer care program supports and complements conventional medical treatment.  The program encompasses the whole person—body, mind and spirit.  While accomplished in addition to conventional medical care, we understand it takes more than medicine to get well and stay well.

Support

When breast cancer strikes, it impacts the entire family and all areas of their life, especially financially.  We have designed our Help Now Fund to assist with the basic needs of cancer patients in need.  The demand is huge and we limit our funding to past-due rents and utilities.  Our commitment: no woman will go through breast cancer without a roof over her head and the basics of daily needs.

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We PRESS Forward in the fight against breast cancer.  We inspire hope.  We nurture healing.  We renew life.

The Breast Cancer Charities of America.  We are the new voice of breast cancer.  We are passionate, filled with energy and a vision.  And we will not stop until breast cancer is no longer a life-threatening disease.

Join us.  Make your voice heard.  It’s a new day in the world of breast cancer.



Komen Controversy: Opportunity to Examine “Life-saving Mammograms”

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The daily news reports over the resignations of the Founder and the President of Komen for the Cure are filled with drama.  That Nancy Brinker’s life’s work seems to have been tarnished makes for compelling media.  But the best outcome of this coverage could be that America engages in a serious discussion about the dangers of breast cancer screening.

Mammography: Time for a New Screening Protocol
Despite the loud protests of many breast cancer organizations and advocacy groups, the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force got it right.  Women do not need as many mammograms as they are receiving.

In November of 2009, the Task Force updated its recommendations on breast cancer screening.  Previous standards stated that women be screened annually from the age of 40 onwards.  A furor arose over the Task Force recommendation that women between 40-49 years old should not have annual mammograms.

Overtreatment of breast cancer is epidemic, a toxic tragedy that leaves the health of hundreds-of-thousands of women compromised for the remainder of their lives.   The over-treatment starts with over-diagnosis in early screening for breast cancer—the belief that early detection is the best protection.  It is not.

Cancer screening enjoys virtually unquestioned cultural acceptance.  On the surface, the logic of screening for breast cancer seems unassailable.  A mammogram can pick up lesions as small as 0.5 cm, a size that you are seldom able to feel.  The test can detect up to 85-percent of all breast cancers.  In short, screening for breast cancer seems to make sense.

But the screening is not without significant shortcomings and health risks.  With mammography, the weak points of screening include:

  • If a woman has dense breasts, a lump is typically not visible.
  • In women under 50-years of age, at least 25-percent of the tumors will be missed.
  • In women with smaller breasts, the screening is even less accurate.

According to Dr. Susan Love, mammograms will miss cancers between 9- and 20-percent of the time.  And if nothing is found, women are given a false sense of security that all is well.

There’s more.  Approximately 5-percent of all mammograms read as positive for cancer.  Of these five, 97.5-percent will be false positives.  This means no cancer is present.  In other words, out of every 1,000 mammograms, fifty are read as positive and between one and two will actually turn out to be breast cancer.  The fact is mammograms are, for the most part, inconclusive.  Yet we treat them as the gold standard of breast cancer screening.

Early screening brings a host of related risks of which American women remain uninformed.  Radiation from routine mammography poses significant cumulative risks of initiating and promoting breast cancer.  Contrary to conventional assurances that radiation exposure from mammography is minimal and tolerable, we have known for at least forty years that the pre-menopausal breast is highly sensitive to radiation.  Each exposure increases breast cancer risk resulting in at least a cumulative 10-percent increased risk over ten years of pre-menopausal screening.

Mammography also poses a risk from breast compression.  As early as 1928, physicians were warned to handle “cancerous breasts with care for fear of accidentally disseminating cells” and spreading cancer.  Mammography requires tight and often painful compression of the breast, particularly in pre-menopausal women. Experts have warned that compression may lead to distant and lethal spread of malignant cells by rupturing small blood vessels in or around small, as yet undetected breast cancers.

Mammography’s reliability is seldom discussed by the medical providers with their patients.  These discussions must become the norm.  The message:

  1.  Missed cancers resulting in false negative readings are especially common in pre-menopausal women.  This is due to the dense and highly glandular structure of their breasts and increased proliferation late in their menstrual cycle.
  2. Missed cancers are also common in post-menopausal women on estrogen replacement therapy, as about 20 percent develop breast densities that make their mammograms as difficult to read as those of pre-menopausal women.
  3. False positive readings, which are mistakenly diagnosed cancers, are common with mammography.  Again, they are common in women on estrogen replacement therapy.  False positives result in needless anxiety, more mammograms and unnecessary biopsies.  For a woman with multiple high-risk factors, including a strong family history of breast cancer, prolonged use of contraceptives and early menarche, the cumulative risk of false positives increases to “as high as 100 percent” over a decade’s screening.

The widespread and virtually unchallenged acceptance of this early screening protocol has resulted in a dramatic increase in the diagnosis of ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS), a pre-invasive cancer.  DCIS was historically recognized as micro-calcifications.  For decades, they were considered benign but suspicious.  The screening guidance was another test in six months to determine if there were noticeable changes.

Today DCIS is widely treated as actual breast cancer.  The treatment is defended by the medical community because with current testing and diagnostic procedures, it is not possible to know if a given DCIS may become malignant or if it will disappear.  Some 80-percent of all DCIS never become invasive even if left untreated. Furthermore, the breast cancer mortality from DCIS is the same, approximately 1-percent, both for women diagnosed and treated early and for those diagnosed later following the development of invasive cancer.  Early detection of DCIS does not reduce mortality.  This fact is startling and seems counterintuitive.  But the data speaks the truth.

A Clarion Call:  New Screening Guidelines
Studies do show that screening mammography does reduce the death rate in women over 50 years of age by approximately 30-percent.  Early detection in this age group works.  However, equal results are available from much less-invasive and non-toxic clinical breast examinations coupled with breast self-exams.

What is more worrisome are new studies which show that in women under 50, screening mammography can increase the death rate from breast cancer by up to 50-percent.  The suspected reason is because these women accumulate radiation toxicity.  Even more, other studies show screening mammography leads to more frequent diagnosis and aggressive treatment of breast cancer.  These same studies also show aggressive screening and treatment does not decrease overall breast cancer mortality.

America clearly needs new breast cancer screening guidelines.  Below is a wise approach widely accepted in countries other than the United States for women under 50-years old:

  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct thorough breast self-examination.  Perform it on the first day of menstruation.
  • Schedule a mammogram only if needed for diagnosis of a suspected lump.  Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle.

For women over 50-years old:

  • Employ annual clinical breast examinations and monthly breast self-examinations as your primary early detection protocol.
  • Once a year, every year, without fail, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider to perform a clinical breast examination.
  • Once a month, every month, without fail, set aside 15 minutes to conduct thorough breast self-examination.  Schedule it on the first day of your period if you are still menstruating.
  • Schedule a mammogram if you discover a suspicious change in the feel of your breast.  Even then, be sure to schedule that mammogram within the first 14 days of your menstrual cycle if you are still menstruating.
  • Employ mammography screening every other year.

Annual clinical breast examination combined with monthly breast self-examination is a safe and effective alternative to mammography.  That most breast cancers are first recognized by women themselves was admitted in 1985 by the American Cancer Society, the leading advocate of routine mammography for all women over the age of 40.  “We must keep in mind the fact that at least 90-percent of the women who develop breast carcinoma discover the tumors themselves”  Furthermore, as previously shown, “training increases reported breast self-examination frequency, confidence, and the number of small tumors found.”

A pooled analysis of several studies showed that women who regularly performed breast self-examinations detected their cancers much earlier and with fewer positives nodes and smaller tumors than women failing to examine themselves.  Plus breast self examinations also enhance earlier detection of missed cancers, especially in pre-menopausal women.

Let’s be clear.  The effectiveness of breast self-exam critically depends on careful training by skilled professionals.  Further, confidence in self-exams is enhanced with annual clinical breast examinations by an experienced professional using structured individual training.  And finally, this strategy requires discipline.  Every year, a clinical breast exam; every month, a breast self-exam.  If a woman cannot or will not meet that standard of discipline, the entire process stands in jeopardy.

The question of more screening extends to what have come to be known as the “breast cancer genes,” BRCA1 (BReast CAncer gene one) and BRCA2 (BReast CAncer gene two). Women who inherit a mutation in either of these genes have a higher-than-average risk of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

The function of the BRCA genes is to keep breast cells growing normally and prevent any cancer cell growth.  When these genes contain the mutations that are passed from generation to generation, they do not function normally and breast cancer risk increases. Abnormal BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes may account for between 5 and 10-percent of all breast cancers.

Should you choose to undergo genetic testing to find out your status? A genetic test involves giving a blood sample that can be analyzed to pick up any abnormalities in these genes.  Testing for these abnormalities is not done routinely, but it may be considered on the basis of your family history and personal situation.  But remember that most people who develop breast cancer have no family history of the disease.

Do mammograms save lives?  The answer is very, very few.  But the massive over-diagnosis and overtreatment they initiate makes routine mammography a very real health hazard.  Were mammograms an automobile, The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration would have recalled them years ago.  A less-is-more breast cancer screening protocol must replace our current policy.  This is the first necessary shift in the evolving integrated breast cancer care model.  Current annual mammography guidelines are exposing nearly all American women to exceedingly high levels of radiation.  It’s part of the toxic tragedy that is making us sicker—and poorer.



Did You Know? 10 Fun Facts about Women

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  1. The word “woman” is believed to have been derived from the Middle English term “wyfman.” If you break that down, it is simply the “wife of man.” Wow.
  2. Did you know that women only own 1% of the world’s land?
  3. The two highest IQ’s ever recorded, according to standard tests, both belong to women. Girl Power at its finest.
  4. The English word “girl” was initially used to describe a young person of either sex.  It was not until the beginning of the sixteenth century that the term was used to specifically describe a female child.
  5. If you are a women in Saudi Arabia, you can get a divorce from your husband if he does not bring you coffee.
  6. In most countries worldwide, the life expectancy for women is higher than men.
  7. The very first Mother’s Day was held on May 10, 1908. It was organized by Anna Jarvis of West Virginia and Philadelphia. As the even gained popularity, Congress designated the second Sunday in May as a national day of recognition for mothers in 1914.
  8. Victoria Woodhull was the first woman to run for U.S. president.  She campaigned for the office in 1872 under the National Woman’s Suffrage Association.  While women would not be granted the right to vote by a constitutional amendment for nearly 50 years, there were no laws prohibiting a woman from running for the chief executive position.
  9. 91% of elementary teachers are women.
  10.  Women blink twice as many times as men do.



Many Factors Can Contribute to an Increased Risk of Breast Cancer

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To have these risk factors present does not mean you are automatically going to get breast cancer and the absence of these factors does not assure you will not get it either. The perfect example is family history. If your family has a history of breast cancer, you are put at higher risk but, 80%-90% of women who get the breast cancer diagnosis have no known family history of it.

Aging is one of the most important although there is a rise in younger women being diagnosed. At age 20, a woman’s risk is 1 in 1,985. Women at age 70, the risk rises to 1 in 24. If a women lives to 85 years old, her risk increases to 1 in 8. In a woman’s lifetime, their risk of getting breast cancer is 8%, or 1 in 12.

Of course there are other factors that can increase your risk. If a woman has her first period before age 12, is in menopause after 55, or has excess weight after menopause, their risk increases.

Even your history of childbirth is a factor. If a woman has her first child after 30, has no children, or is taking birth control pills for five years or longer, their risk of breast cancer increases.

Drinking more than one alcoholic drink per day, current use of estrogen and progesterone hormone replacement therapy, high breast density, exposure to large amounts of radiation, a previous biopsy showing an excessive growth of tissue, treatment for Hodgkin’s disease at a young age, and a history of breast or ovarian cancer are all risk factors.

It is important to do all that you can to live a healthy lifestyle. Learn about prevention.



Did you know?

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