Baked Pasta with Sausage, tomatoes & cheese

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Becky Luigart-Stayner; Jan Gautro

This easy, cheesy pasta recipe features ziti, turkey sausage, canned tomatoes, and fresh basil. It’s a perfect pasta dish for busy weeknights.

 

Yield:  8 servings (serving size: 1 1/2 cups)

 

1 (1-pound) package uncooked ziti (short tube-shaped pasta)
1 pound hot turkey Italian sausage links
1 cup chopped onion
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 (14.5-ounce) cans petite-diced tomatoes, undrained
1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
Cooking spray
1 cup (4 ounces) shredded fresh mozzarella cheese
1 cup (4 ounces) grated fresh Parmesan cheese

 

 

Preheat oven to 350°.

Cook pasta according to package directions, omitting salt and fat. Drain the pasta, and set aside.

Remove casings from sausage. Cook sausage, onion, and garlic in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until browned, stirring to crumble. Add the tomato paste, salt, pepper, and tomatoes, and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Combine cooked pasta, sausage mixture, and basil. Place half of the pasta mixture in a 4-quart casserole coated with cooking spray. Top with half of mozzarella and half of Parmesan. Repeat layers. Bake at 350° for 25 minutes or until bubbly.

 

CALORIES 413 (26% from fat); FAT 11.8g (sat 6.1g,mono 2.2g,poly 1g); IRON 7.9mg; CHOLESTEROL 49mg; CALCIUM 265mg; CARBOHYDRATE 53g; SODIUM 941mg; PROTEIN 24.1g; FIBER 4.5g

 



Top 10 Foods Highest in Vitamin B9 (Folate)

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Vitamin B9 (aka: folate) is a water-soluble B vitamin with many rich natural sources. Folic acid is the synthetic form of vitamin B9 found in fortified foods and supplements. As with most vitamins, the natural form of vitamin B9 (folate) is preferred, and better for absorption. Vitamin B9 (folate) is required for numerous body functions including DNA synthesis and repair, cell division, and cell growth. A deficiency of folate can lead to anemia in adults, and slower development in children. For pregnant women, folate is especially important for proper fetal development. Folate, Vitamin B9, is a water soluble vitamin that is well regulated by the body, thus overdose is rare in natural food sources, and can only occur from supplements. The current DV for Folate (Vitamin B9) is 400μg.

 

1

#1: Beans (Black Eyed Peas – Cooked)

Folate in 100g Per cup (171g) Per ounce (28g)
208µg (52% DV) 356µg (89% DV) 58µg (15% DV)

Other Beans High in Folate (%DV per cup cooked): Mung Beans (80%), Pinto Beans (74%), Chickpeas (71%), Pink Beans (71%), Lima Beans (68%), Black Beans (64%), Navy Beans (64%), and Kidney Beans (58%)

2

#2: Lentils (Cooked)

Folate in 100g Per cup (198g) Per tablespoon (12g)
181µg (45% DV) 358µg (90% DV) 22µg (5% DV)

Half a cup of cooked lentils contains 115 calories and less than half a gram of fat.

3

#3: Spinach (Raw)

Folate in 100g Per cup (30g) Per cup (Cooked – 180g)
194µg (49% DV) 58µg (15% DV) 263µg (66% DV)

Other Dark Green Leafy Vegetables High in Folate (%DV per cup cooked): Turnip Greens (42%), Pak Choi (Chinese Cabbage)(17%), Savoy Cabbage (17%), and Collard Greens (8%).

4

#4: Asparagus (Cooked)

Folate in 100g Per 1/2 cup (90g) Per 4 spears (60g)
149µg (37% DV) 134µg (34% DV) 89µg (22% DV)

5

#5: Lettuce (Cos or Romaine)

Folate in 100g Per 3oz Serving (85g) Per cup (Shredded – 47g)
136µg (34% DV) 116µg (29% DV) 64µg (16% DV)

Other Lettuce High in Folate (%DV per cup shredded): Endive (18%), Butterhead (10%), Salad Cress (10%), Chicory (8%), and Arugula (4%).

6

#6: Avocado 

Folate in 100g Per cup cubed (150g) Per avocado (201g)
81µg (20% DV) 122µg (30% DV) 163µg (41% DV)

Half an avocado contains 161 calories.

7
#7: Broccoli (Cooked)

Folate in 100g Per 1/2 cup chopped (78g) Per stalk (180g)
108µg (27% DV) 84µg (21% DV) 194µg (49% DV)

Other Brassica Vegetables High in Folate (%DV per cup cooked):Chinese Broccoli (22%), Broccoli Raab (15%), and Cauliflower (14%).

8

#8: Tropical Fruits (Mango)

Folate in 100g Per cup (Pieces – 165g) Per fruit (336g)
43µg (11% DV) 71µg (18% DV) 145µg (36% DV)

Other Tropical Fruit High in Folate (%DV per fruit): Pomegranate (27%), Papaya (15%), Guava (7%), Kiwi (7%), and Banana (6%).

9

#9: Oranges

Folate in 100g Per cup segments (180g) Per orange (121g)
39µg (10% DV) 70µg (18% DV) 47µg (12% DV)

A cup of orange juice provides 19% DV for folate.

10

#10: Bread (Wheat Bread)

Folate 100g Per slice (29g) Per ounce (28g)
85µg (21% DV) 25µg (6% DV) 24µg (6% DV)

Other Bread High in Folate (%DV per slice): French Bread (24%), Italian Bread (14%), Wheat Germ Bread (8%).

 

Read the original article here.



New Dietary Guidelines On Cancer Prevention!

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Reading about the latest cancer – fighting nutrition guidelines and tips can feel like a daunting task at times considering the vast amount of information that is easily available at the click of a button in the virtual age that we live in now. There’s irony to be found here in the fact that as soon as we put down the article that we’re reading about how terrible butter is for us, there’s a new published study claiming that there’s heart-healthy benefits to consuming butter.

We live in a world that offers answers at the click of a button, but maneuvering these murky waters is the difficult part. Recently a new article was published in the Houston Chronicle about “cancer – busting, dietary guidelines are more stringent.” This article presents a new paper by Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, advocating for minimal alcohol, and red-meat consumption, as well as other limiting dietary factors.

Dr. Barnard is quick to acknowledge that there are few absolutes in the field of nutrition, however his new findings come at a time that Americans are recovering from their “holiday binges,” post – 4th of July. Dr. Barnard’s new dietary guidelines on cancer prevention are interesting and worthwhile considering, since the information presented may come as previously known knowledge by others.

Dr. Barnard’s finding and the article itself are well written and provide a 2-sided argument to these new dietary guidelines. If you’d like to read the full article, we think you’ll gain a thing or two from it, so check it out!

Read more about the article!

 

 



9 Surprising Health Benefits of Tomatoes

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Tomatoes! They’re sweet, juicy, and delicious. Everyone knows they are good for you, right? Uh, yeah, sure. Does everyone know specifically why tomatoes are a healthful food? Ummm… They have vitamin C? They’re low in calories? They’re fat-free? Yes, yes, and yes, but that’s not all!

Let’s look at what makes the tomato an excellent healthy choice.

Tomatoes 101

One serving of red, ripe, raw tomatoes (one cup or 150 grams) is a good source of Vitamins A, C, K, folate and potassium. Tomatoes are naturally low in sodium, saturated fat, cholesterol, and calories. Tomatoes also provide thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, magnesium, phosphorus and copper, all of which are necessary for good health.

On top of that, one serving of tomatoes gives you 2 grams of fiber, which is 7% of the daily recommended amount. Tomatoes also have a relatively high water content, which makes them a filling food. In general eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, including tomatoes, confers protection against high blood pressure, high cholesterol, strokes, and heart disease.

One tomato packs one powerful punch of nutrition, but there’s much more!

Healthy Skin

Tomatoes make your skin look great. Beta-carotene, also found in carrots and sweet potatoes, helps protect skin against sun damage. Tomatoes’ lycopene also makes skin less sensitive to UV light damage, a leading cause of fine lines and wrinkles.

Strong Bones

Tomatoes build strong bones.The vitamin K and calcium in tomatoes are both very good for strengthening and repairing bones.

 Lycopene also has been shown to improve bone mass, which is a great way to fight osteoporosis.

Fight Cancer

Tomatoes are a natural cancer fighter. Lycopene (again!) can reduce the risk of several cancers, including prostate, cervical, mouth, pharynx, throat, esophagus, stomach, colon, rectal, prostate and ovarian cancer. Tomatoes’ antioxidants (vitamins A and C) fight the free radicals which can cause cell damage

Blood Sugar

Tomatoes can keep your blood sugar in balance. Tomatoes are a very good source of chromium, which helps to regulate blood sugar.

Vision

Tomatoes can improve your vision. The vitamin A that tomatoes provide can improve vision and help prevent night blindness. Recent research shows that consuming tomatoes may help reduce the risk of macular degeneration, a serious and irreversible eye condition.

Hair

Tomatoes will even make your hair look better.The vitamin A found in tomatoes works to make hair strong and shiny. (Sorry, tomatoes cannot help much with thinning hair—but they will make the hair you have look better!)

Prevent Kidney Stones and Gallstones

Tomatoes can help prevent kidney stones and gallstones. Some studies suggest that kidney and gall stones are less likely to form in people who eat tomatoes without the seeds.

Chronic Pain

Tomatoes can reduce chronic pain. If you are one of the millions of people who deal with mild to moderate chronic pain (such as from arthritis or back pain), tomatoes may be a pain-buster. Tomatoes are high in bioflavonoids and carotenoids, which are known anti-inflammatory agents.

Chronic pain often involves chronic inflammation, so attacking the inflammation is a good way to fight the chronic pain. (Many commercial drugs that fight pain are actually anti-inflammatory drugs.)

Lose Weight

Tomatoes can help you lose weight. If you are on a sensible diet and exercise plan, build lots of tomatoes into your everyday eating. They make a great snack and can be used to “bulk up” salads, casseroles, sandwiches and other meals. Because tomatoes contain lots of water and fiber, they are what Weight Watchers calls a “filling food,” one of those foods that fills you up fast without adding a lot of calories or fat.

TOMO

Easy Ways to Eat More Tomatoes

· Add sliced tomatoes to sandwiches—from tuna to turkey

· Chop tomatoes in salad (leave them at room temperature, if possible)

· Use marinara or tomato sauces (canned, cooked, or homemade) on pasta; this can be big calorie savings when you swap out creamy sauces for tomato-based sauces

· Drink tomato juice or vegetable juice with tomatoes

· Tomatoes for breakfast? Top scrambled eggs with coarsely chopped tomatoes or add them to a breakfast taco

· Eat tomatoes as a mid-afternoon snack (my father used to eat them like an apple—but you can use a knife and fork)

· Make a tomato sandwich—this is a sandwich that stars the tomato. The classic dressing for this sandwich is mayonnaise, but I know some people who like tomatoes and mustard

· Add canned or stewed tomatoes to soups and stews, like vegetable soup or beef stew

· Serve stewed tomatoes over a baked potato (also great on mashed potatoes)

· Make your own salsa with lots of fresh tomato—salsa is a great replacement for high-fat salad dressings as well as being tasty on meats, fish, and eggs

 

Read the original article here.



7 Summer Salad Ideas

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Fresh salads can be a light and healthy choice for the summer. Here are seven summer salad ideas to make your summer a little healthier!
SunflowerSeed Salad

Arugula, Grape, and Sunflower Seed Salad

By including a variety of ingredients, salads are often a nutritional powerhouse: This recipe provides lots of antioxidants from the grapes, healthy fats and vitamin E from the sunflower seeds and grapeseed oil, and folate and vitamin A from the arugula. A sweet mustard vinaigrette dressing matches both the peppery bitterness of the greens and the sweet juiciness of the grapes. Try this salad topped with salmon or tuna for a healthful dinner.View Recipe: Arugula, Grape, and Sunflower Seed Salad 

TunaGarbanzo

Tuna-Garbanzo Salad

With fresh green beans, hearty garbanzos, and a smoky-creamy dressing, this Spanish tapas-style dish is unlike any other tuna salad you’ve tried. But it still takes less than 10 minutes to make and contains fewer than 400 calories per serving. High-quality tuna is a must; check European or Mediterranean markets for imported oil-packed tuna.View Recipe: Tuna-Garbanzo SaladProscuitto



Summer Pool Snacks: 11 Healthy Choices

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Summer is here! With summer comes the pool fun (an opportunity for some vitamin D) and it’s important to be prepared with healthy summer pool snacks so you don’t find yourself running though a drive-thru. We found this great blog post from Natalie with SuperHealthyKids.com and thought we’d share! It’s great not only for kids, but adults too!

“Swimming (and any water activity for that matter) always makes my kids super hungry.  Without fail, they swim for a while, and then come running asking for snacks.  Bringing pre-packaged snacks is easy, but with a little bit of planning, you can bring healthy filling snacks to the pool for your kidlets.  Our snack ideas are not only healthy, but filling enough to give your kids the energy they need to swim, run and play on a summer day!

 Banana Boats 

Cut a banana in half lengthwise and spread with peanut butter.  Then sandwich back together for less of a mess!

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Boiled Eggs and Veggie Sticks

Packed full of protein, boiled eggs are easy to transport and filling.  Veggie sticks are a given – by themselves, or great dipped in hummus for a little extra oomph!

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Frozen Grapes

Sweet, refreshing, and delicious! Never frozen grapes before?  It is so easy.

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Muffins

Who says muffins are just for breakfast?  Packed full of healthy carbohydrates, they are the perfect pool snack to give your kids lots of energy.  Make them ahead, freeze them and then pull a few out for your next trip to the pool.  Your kids will go bananas over our Banana Bread Muffin.

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Laughing cow cheese is one of our favorite snacks.  It is great to bring to the pool – fast and convenient.  It is delicious spread on veggie sticks, apples, pears, and crackers.

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Homemade Crackers

When you make your own, you know exactly what is in them.  Plus you can make lots of varieties!  Here are a couple of our recipes.

Cheese Crackers

Corn Chips

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Homemade Fruit Leather

Kids love fruit snacks – but they are packed full of sugar.  Our homemade fruit leather is all-natural, no-added sugar, and so fast to whip up a batch!

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Homemade Lunchable

Cheese, turkey, whole-grain crackers and your favorite fruit.  Great for a pool-side snack or lunch!

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Quick Bread

The great thing about quick bread is that you can make it ahead and freeze it.  Then on your next pool trip, bring it with you and let it thaw.  It will be moist and delicious by the time you are ready to eat it! This Peach Crisp Bread is one of our favorites.

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Trail Mix

Here are some of our favorite mixes.

Sweet Snack Mix

Trail Mix Ideas

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Edamame

This simple and quick snack is packed full of protein and fiber.

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Healthy and Affordable Meals Can Change your Life!

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Eating healthy doesn’t have to eat at your credit card bill also.  At Breast Cancer Charities of America it’s common to hear comments from breast cancer patients of, “I wish I could afford to eat healthy…it’s so expensive.”  Well this week, we’re talking about great ways to eat clean and healthy with affordable meals that won’t break the bank.

One of the best ways to start this off with is remembering WHAT is clean and healthy eating.Vegitable display in a market  Best way we remind folks…shop the perimeter of the store.  Think about it…on the outer edges of the store are where you find the FRESH veggies, the FRESH fruit, the bakery fresh breads (and yes, the ice cream isle too but we’ll forget about that one….everything in moderation is what we say!)  But for the most part the outside walls of your local grocery store have the things that are fresh, aren’t filled with preservatives and are great for your diet.

Next step in this is getting creative in your cooking and planning ahead.  Fresh food may be a few dollars more than the processed/pre-packaged food, but it will most certainly save on your long term medical bills due to your health!  Try planning a weeks worth of healthy meals ahead of time.  Take for example how far (and great tasting) BBQ chicken in the slow cooker can go.

  • Monday:  BBQ Chicken served with corn on the cob and sweet potatoes sprinkled with honey and cayenne pepper
  • Tuesday:  Left over BBQ Chicken shredded up over a romaine lettuce salad topped with black beans, corn, a diced tomato, green onions and cilantro topped with a simple olive oil or balsamic vinaigrette
  • Wednesday:  Left over BBQ Chicken shredded up on top of a whole wheat pizza crust topped with BBQ sauce…add red onion slices, low fat mozzarella cheese, cilantro and even a sprinkle of feta cheese (we promise you won’t have any leftovers!)
  • Thursday: Take any leftover chicken you may have (and freeze in between the time from cooking it to keep it fresh) and have a homemade family taco night.  Purchase from the bakery whole wheat tortillas, top with BBQ chicken, grilled red onions, bell peppers and cheddar cheese and you’ll love what a fun BBQ taco tastes like

iStock_000016732254Small

Right there…you have four easy, healthy and enjoyable meals for your family….and to top it off, they’re extremely affordable.

Remember, you always have the ability to control what you eat!  We constantly hear the saying “you are what you eat”…so eat healthy!  Eat clean…get your family involved in making smart decisions.  As we constantly say, “eat a plant!”…can’t go wrong there!  Make healthy eating fun and your family will thank you for years to come!

 



Whole Grains: Weed Out Imposter Ingredients

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Want to curb your risk of cancer and other diseases? Eating whole grains with every meal can help.

That’s because whole grains are loaded with fiber, vitamins, minerals and natural plant compounds. These compounds help protect your cells from damage that can lead to cancer. Added bonus: the fiber found in whole grains helps you stay full longer, maintain a healthy weight, and keep your cholesterol and blood sugar at normal levels.

But not all grains do the trick. Only grains that haven’t been processed contain the whole grain kernel — and offer all the disease-fighting perks you get from eating whole grains.

Unfortunately, finding whole grains can be a little tricky because many foods include ingredients that sound like whole grains but aren’t.

So, how can you tell what foods are actually whole grains? Below, we break down what to look for.

grains-nutrition-webLook for the word “Whole”

Grocery store shelves are filled with grains and grain products. Those include whole grains, multi-grains, seven-grain, bran, whole wheat and stone-ground products.

But only those that include the word “whole” — whole grains and whole wheat — are actually whole grains. That’s true whether you’re looking at a package for whole wheat pasta or whole wheat bread.

Multi-grains, seven-grain, bran and wheat products usually do have some health perks. So, don’t skip them altogether. Just don’t expect them to provide your daily fill of whole grains.

After all, the grains in these foods have been refined, which destroys the grain’s nutrient-rich, cancer-fighting outer layer. And, even when food manufacturers “enrich” these grains, they don’t restore the full health benefits of whole grains.

 

Get to know other whole grains

Keep in mind that many whole grains don’t actually include “whole” or even “grains” in their name. Here are some common ingredients and foods that are great sources of whole grains:

  • Bulgur wheat
  • Buckwheat
  • Barley, preferably hulled
  • Cornmeal, preferably whole graingrains, ingredients
  • Kasha
  • Millet
  • Oats
  • Oat bran
  • Oatmeal
  • Quinoa
  • Wild or brown rice
  • Tabouleh
  • Whole rye
  • Whole wheat

 Choose foods with the Whole Grain Stamp

NEW WG stamp ver. 3.AI

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s an easy way to spot whole grains: look for a golden Whole Grain Stamp on the food package. There are actually two versions of the Whole Grain Stamp.

  • The 100% Stamp says “100%” across the stamp. It only appears on products where all grain ingredients are whole grains.  Products with this stamp contain at least 16 grams of whole grain per serving.
  • The Basic Stamp does not say “100%.” Foods with this stamp contain at least 8 grams (a half-serving) of whole grain, but they also may include some refined grains, such as extra bran, germ or refined flour.

Choose whole grains listed at the top of the label’s ingredient list

Choosing a product with one or more ingredients? Whenever possible, pick items that list the whole grain ingredients first.

That’s because an item that lists, say, quinoa as the first ingredient contains far more cancer-fighting whole grains than a food that lists quinoa (or any other whole grain) last.

Include whole grains in every meal

Want to reap the cancer-fighting benefits of whole grains? Your best bet is to make them part of every meal.

 

We hope you enjoyed this article as much as we did! It was written by Laura Nathan-Garner with MD Anderson.
See the original article HERE!



Spices that Liven up Your Food and Health

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Ever think of spices as more than just flavor to add to your food?  Not only do spices make people ask “mmm, what’s that flavor” but the health benefits are endless!  Spices give us such an easy way to control things such as blood sugar, prevent against inflammation that can lead to heart disease, cancer and diabetes and even reports have started to show the benefits in weight management all due to spices! 

 

Check out this list of spices you can find in your pantry or at the local grocery store to bring extra flavor and health benefits to you and your family.  As always, consult with your medical professional before making any major changes to your diet.

Cinnamon-

We all have it in our pantry…but have you ever tried sprinkling it in your coffee grinds in the morning?  It’s excellent…and bonus, cinnamon is filled with antioxidants that help fight against diseases.  It’s also been known to help regulate blood sugar in diabetic’s diets.  It’s a wonderful, sweet spice that adds lots of flavor.

 

Turmeric-

This spice stems from the ginger family and makes a mean curry recipe!  But above that, studies have shown that it may also help fight cancer.  Turmeric is excellent on chicken dishes with wild rice and gives a warm spice taste to your meal.

 

Thyme-

This is one of my personal favorites and when you cook with it, you always get the “what’s in this…it’s delicious”.  Thyme comes from the mint family and can help suppress inflammation according to the study in the Journal of Lipid Research.

 

Rosemary-

This herb requires an acquired pallet as many people make the comment that it’s such a strong herb.  In my opinion, it’s one of the most underutilized herbs in making meals.  And if you’re looking to change your opinion on Rosemary, it’s been shown in studies to significantly cut your cancer risk.

 

Parsley-

In a study by the University of Missouri, scientists found that this herb can actually inhibit breast cancer cell growth.  This herb pairs well with garlic, capers, fish, chicken and lemon.

 



Wellness Wednesday: Fall Fitness Tips

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Seriously, what’s not to love about fall? Pumpkin lattes are back, you can dig out your favorite sweaters, and sweet potatoes are finally in season. Best of all, the crisp temps make fall the perfect time to exercise outdoors: “The cool weather allows you to enjoy yourself without having to worry about being overheated or too cold,” says Terri Walsh, celebrity trainer and creator of the Active Resistance Training Method (A.R.T.). And that means you’re more likely to feel awesome during your workout, and maybe even log an extra mile or climb another trail.

But before you lace up and head outside, prepare for your outdoor adventure with Walsh’s fall weather workout tips:

Wear Layers
It may feel slightly nippy at first, but the weather has a rep for changing on a moment’s notice. Dress in layers that you can easily remove if your body starts to heat up—or put back on if you get cold, says Walsh.

Stay Hydrated
Many people forget to drink enough fluids during fall workouts because it’s not super hot, says Walsh. Not good. Keep drinking as normal to avoid dehydration. While it’s good to carry water, you can add some flavor with a bit of fruit juice to get even more nutrients.

Pack Snacks
Don’t disrupt your outing for a food pit stop. If you’ll be out most of the day hiking or biking, Walsh recommends bringing a small backpack with nuts or fruit stashed inside. No matter where you are, at least you have a constant source of fuel.

And if you think running is the only outdoor exercise to try, it’s time to get creative! If you’re near some branches and a log, you’ll definitely want to try this off-the-beaten-trail circuit workout. But if a park is your only outdoor fitness center, find a jungle gym and do these fun exercises on the playground. The kids in line for the monkey bars can wait their turn.

 

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/fitness/fall-workout-exercise-tips