Motivational Monday: BEGIN.

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Every Decision



Motivational Monday: Work for your DREAMS

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Dreams don't work



Motivational Monday

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impossible



Wellness Wednesday

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Breast Cancer Charity Events in The Woodlands

Updated: Friday, 01 Oct 2010, 11:28 AM CDT
Published : Friday, 01 Oct 2010, 11:28 AM CDT

THE WOODLANDS, Texas – It is difficult for someone to imagine being diagnosed with breast cancer and not having the financial resources to pay for treatment.
It is a reality for many women to choose between either paying rent. or paying medical bills.

Non-profit organization The Breast Cancer Charities of America serves the women of Texas by helping with additional expenses such as the cost of rent and food.

FOX 26 Morning News Extra met with one BCCA volunteer Maria Ortega, a breast cancer survivor.

BCCA has been able to help twenty women across Texas and six in the Houston area.

Two BCCA fundraising events will take place in October.

Erica Harvey from BCCA previews the Stiletto Sprint and Unmasking Breast Cancer Masquerade Gala on FOX 26 Morning News Extra.

The Stiletto Sprint takes place Saturday, Oct. 16 at Creekside Park in The Woodlands. Registration for men’s and women’s races begins at 7:30 a.m.

The Unmasking Breast Cancer Masquerade Gala takes place Friday, Oct. 29 in Avia The Woodlands between 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. Tickets for the event cost $100 each.

On the Web:

The Breast Cancer Charities of America — http://www.thebreastcancercharities.org/

For the full video go to http://www.myfoxhouston.com/dpp/health/101001-breast-cancer-charity-events-the-woodlands



Wellness Wednesday

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Oct. 29 – Breast cancer nonprofit set to host gala at Avia

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Erica Harvey, executive director, and Rebecca Titone, program manager for BCCA, test out ideas for decorations for their gala to raise money for breast cancer at Avia.

Unmasking Breast Cancer Masquerade Gala

When: 7-11 p.m. Oct. 29

Where: Avia Hotel, 9595 Six Pines Drive

Cost: $100 per ticket with sponsorships available

More info: www.thebreastcancercharities.org, www.igopink.org or www.unmaskingbreastcancer.com

By Lauren Hodges
Updated: 09.28.10

Breast Cancer Charities of America, a global independent nonprofit with headquarters in The Woodlands, will host an inaugural gala to raise money for breast cancer programs Oct. 29 at Avia Hotel.

Proceeds will go to BCCA programs, such as the Help Now Fund and iGoPink campaign. Help Now helps breast cancer patients pay rent and utilities, and iGoPink is a fashion-forward campaign that takes a new approach to assisting breast cancer patients.

“Eighty percent of net funds raised at the gala will go to work in the local community,” said Erica Harvey, executive director of BCCA and iGoPink.

There will be a cocktail reception, and the band Yelba will perform at the Unmasking Breast Cancer Masquerade Gala. The name of the gala ties into the organization’s mission of unmasking new noninvasive treatments for breast cancer.

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–>Attendees are encouraged to dress for the masquerade theme and wear hot pink to support the cause. Educational material about breast cancer and how to prevent it will be available. A silent auction will include trips, jewelry and dining experiences. There will be artistic and interactive activities at the gala, such as a photo booth.

“It’s like an adult Halloween party in The Woodlands,” Harvey said.

BCCA, located at 2002 Timberloch Place, Suite 200, is associated with 200 hospitals. In 2009, it provided $1.5 million for breast cancer research, financial assistance and educational programs, which was funded in the first five months of operation.

BCCA has been linked with fashion designers such as Trina Turk, who has a high-end clothing line available at Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom and Bloomingdales. Harvey said the organization’s appeal and logo, which includes a stiletto heel, has brought in people to work on projects.

To qualify for the Help Now Fund, women must be referred by a social worker, nurse or hospital. Critical cases are considered first.

“We look at integrating a person’s lifestyle into the medical treatment,” Harvey said. “We focus on mind, body and spirit.”

Harvey said iGoPink follows a care pyramid of six elements: medical, nutrition, exercise, attitude, support and meaning and purpose.

“(We figure out) how the person can impact themselves, how you can take preventative measures to increase your health with what you currently have,” she said.

Tickets are $100 for the gala, and sponsorships are available. Sponsorships will be finalized by Oct. 20. The event is black tie optional. For more information, visit www.thebreastcancercharities.org, www.igopink.org or www.unmaskingbreastcancer.com.

Lauren Hodges can be reached at lhodges@hcnonline.com.



Thoughtful Thursday

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October is just around the corner, which means breast cancer awareness month is right around the corner! If you are looking to get involved in the fight against breast cancer, October is just the month to host your own fundraiser!

Here are some great ideas to help you get started!……Help BCCA out and make an impact in women’s lives!  For more information on The Breast Cancer Charities of America visit  www.thebreastcancercharities.org

Do you want to host an event or fundraiser in your local community to benefit iGoPink/BCCA? Check out some of the great DIY event ideas listed below with step-by-step instructions to make your fundraiser be successful, easy to host and lots of fun for a good cause. If you would like to host an event to donate to our charity please fill out our Registration Form

For more information on hosting your own event check out this link!  Third Party Event FAQs 

If you are also thinking of becoming a sponsor please check out this form. Pink Partners FAQ 

 

Host a barbecue fundraiser in your own backyard! Planning a barbecue fundraiser can be lots of fun especially when the weather is right. Barbecue fundraisers are a great way to raise money for breast cancer: the host earns funds for breast cancer quickly and guests get a delicious meal at a good price.
involved today

 

Host a pink potluck, raising awareness for breast cancer. This is a great way to plan a meal for your event and get people involved! Try hosting the pink potluck at your house, even in your backyard if the weather is nice.
Get involved today 

 

Host Bunco for Breast Cancer event to raise awareness for breast cancer! Bunco fundraisers are an entertaining and successful way to raise money for The Breast Cancer Charities of America.
Read more

 

Why not hold a Basket Bingo Fundraiser event? This is an exciting way to get people spending money for a worthy cause. People enjoy playing bingo and want to help the fight against breast cancer.
Read more

 

NO SELLING! NO LISTS! NO PICKUP OR DELIVERY DATES! NO DEADLINES! NO MERCHANDISE! What a deal!
Read more

 

Host a pink out picnic in your backyard! This event takes a little more work because a pink out picnic fundraiser means choosing creative announcements, determining an entrance fee, preparing food, finding volunteers, and lining up a raffle to bring in even more funds for The Breast Cancer Charities of America.
Read more

 

The student who collects the most donations gets to pick a teacher to dye their hair/mustache/beard PINK FOR A WEEK!
Read more

 

I hereby pledge to do my best in school, to have a winning attitude, and to be on my best behavior every day. Would you be willing to pledge a few dollars for my A’s & B’s to help raise money for The Breast Cancer Charities of America?
Read more

 

 

Celebrate with friends and family at home with “cosmos for a cause”! It’s a great way to bond, make memories, let loose, and support Breast Cancer Charities of America!  DIY Cosmos



Wellness Wednesday

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Surviving breast cancer with a sense of humor: One mom’s story

Stupid Cancer by:
Michelle Maffei
As hard as the fight must be to beat breast cancer, one mother has chosen to “be a survivor, not a victim,” for herself and her family — all while keeping the sense of humor she is well known for. Read the story of Stephani J., a courageous mother, sister and wife who discovered that life does not stop once you are diagnosed with breast cancer.

Putting it in Perspective

Stephanie J. from Costa Mesa, California is a dedicated worker, a good friend, a sister, a wife, and a mother. Hearing the news on May 30, 2008 that her tests came back positive for breast cancer left her mind reeling about the journey that lay ahead. But, “I refuse to let this cancer define who I am. It is something that is happening to me, that’s all,” reassures Stephanie. And, to support her position, she even sported a shirt that read, “Stupid Cancer,” flavored with her silly humor and her refusal to let Breast Cancer bring her down.

History Repeating Itself

Two years prior, Stephanie had experienced a breast infection, but after a round of antibiotics, a mammogram, and an ultrasound which came back negative, the infection was given the all clear. All was well until a second breast infection appeared in the same area about two months prior to her diagnosis, which brought on the same round of treatment and tests, this time accompanied with a fine needle biopsy. With an inconclusive result and the infection seemingly healed, Stephanie was given a follow-up ultrasound. Five “nodules” were identified as suspicious, two of which a core needle biopsy was performed.

When both sites came back as Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Stephanie was scheduled for a bilateral mastectomy in June 2008, in which both breasts were scheduled to be removed. 

Family Focus

“One of the most difficult moments was when I was diagnosed and I was worried about how it was going to affect my three-and-a-half-year-old son. I had a really hard time struggling with the concern.” After speaking with a therapist, Stephanie was reassured that the plans she and her husband were making about post-op treatment were just an extension of his normal routine, which helped subdue some of the stress she was feeling.

“At his age, he doesn’t really comprehend it as much. In some ways it’s a lot better. He puts it in his own perspective, as “Mommy’s sick.” What’s important at this age is to give him every single piece of information he asks for, allow him to process it on his own, and most importantly, not to force him how to deal with it. My job is to be here to help manage it,” says Stephanie.

Laughter is the Best Medicine

To help thank the strong circle of support she had been receiving and to share the positive attitude she is carrying with her pre-surgery, Stephanie used her love of humor to threw herself a “Ta ta to the tat as” party. It was an upbeat affair, adorned with appropriately-shaped cakes and cupcakes and supporting the fight against breast cancer.

Post-Surgery TLC

After a successful surgery, it was determined that she would receive Chemo every three weeks for four and a half to five months, which she began in July. Now approaching the end of her Chemo treatments, she will begin radiation treatment, five days a week for three weeks.

As Stephanie can tell you, Chemo is no walk in the park. But, the loving support from her husband, family, friends, and work, and the sweet gestures from her now four-year-old son help her keep her spirits up and her humor strong.

“He knows I have ups and downs, when Mommy is sick and when Mommy is okay. Asks me, “How can I make you feel better?” and does something sweet.” Although it is rough on Stephanie seeing how her post-surgery and Chemo was rough on him, she acknowledges that, “he’s been handling it pretty well. We’ve been handling it all okay because we’re handling it as a family unit, and it helps that [my son is] younger.”

Work Support

Stephanie returned to work in mid-August 2008, where her circle of support was stronger than ever. Her boss is a cancer survivor, and just two years ago, Stephanie supported her boss through the entire process at that time. “When I was diagnosed, I knew I was in a supportive environment, knew a little bit of what to expect, and had a strong example and a great source of advice to follow,” shares Stephanie.

Family Future

Some people take for granted the decision whether or not to have more biological children, but with Breast Cancer survivors, the decision is made for them. The risk is very high that pregnancy can cause the cancer to return, but the option to expand their family is not a closed case. Stephanie adds, “I was adopted, so we are very open to the option, but for now, we have peace of mind knowing our family will remain a family of three.”

As Stephanie begins her radiation treatment, she continues to use her strong spirit and great sense of humor to help her remain another one of the more than 2.3 million women in the U.S. who have survived breast cancer or are living with breast cancer today, according to the National Cancer Institute’s research for 2007. Although Breast Cancer is no laughing matter, if you or someone you know is facing the fight, take a look through Stephanie’s perspective and come up with a list of your own 20 positive things that you can find about Cancer…it may just be the little light-hearted lift you needed.

This article was found on www.sheknows.com. Be sure to check out their website to find more stories just like this one!



Fitness Friday

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Are you stressed and looking for a way to relax?  Here is a great article about exercise and stress brought to you by www.mayoclinic.com

Exercise and stress: Get moving to combat stress

One way to take control of the stress in your life is through physical activity. Being active can boost your feel-good endorphins and distract you from daily worries.

By Mayo Clinic staff

You know that exercise does your body good, but you’re too busy and stressed to fit it into your routine. Hold on a second — there’s good news when it comes to exercise and stress.

Virtually any form of exercise, from aerobics to weightlifting, can act as a stress reliever. If you’re not an athlete or even if you’re downright out of shape, you can still make a little exercise go a long way toward stress management. Discover the connection between exercise and stress relief — and why exercise should be part of your stress management plan.

Exercise and stress relief

Exercise increases your overall health and your sense of well-being, which puts more pep in your step every day. But exercise also has some direct stress-busting benefits.

  • It pumps up your endorphins. Physical activity helps to bump up the production of your brain’s feel-good neurotransmitters, called endorphins. Although this function is often referred to as a runner’s high, a rousing game of tennis or a nature hike also can contribute to this same feeling.
  • It’s meditation in motion. After a fast-paced game of racquetball or several laps in the pool, you’ll often find that you’ve forgotten the day’s irritations and concentrated only on your body’s movements. As you begin to regularly shed your daily tensions through movement and physical activity, you may find that this focus on a single task, and the resulting energy and optimism, can help you remain calm and clear in everything that you do.
  • It improves your mood. Regular exercise can increase self-confidence and lower the symptoms associated with mild depression and anxiety. Exercise also can improve your sleep, which is often disrupted by stress, depression and anxiety. All this can ease your stress levels and give you a sense of command over your body and your life.

Put exercise and stress relief to work for you

A successful exercise program begins with a few simple steps.

  • Consult with your doctor. Begin any new fitness program by consulting with your health care professional, especially if you have any medical conditions or are obese.
  • Walk before you run. Build up your fitness level gradually. Excitement about a new program can lead to overdoing it and possibly even injury. Plus, if you begin your program slowly, chances are better you’ll stick with it. If you’re new to exercise, aim for about 20 to 30 minutes of exercise three to four days a week and increase gradually. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends getting at least two hours and 30 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity (think brisk walking or swimming) or one hour and 15 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity (such as running) — preferably spread throughout the week. It also recommends strength training exercises at least twice a week.
  • Do what you love, and love what you do. Don’t train for a marathon if you dislike running. Virtually any form of exercise or movement can increase your fitness level while decreasing your stress. The most important thing is to pick an activity that you enjoy. Examples include walking, stair climbing, jogging, bicycling, yoga, tai chi, gardening, weightlifting and swimming.
  • Pencil it in. Although your schedule may necessitate a morning workout one day and an evening activity the next, carving out some time to move every day helps you make your exercise program an ongoing priority.

Sticking with it

Starting an exercise program is just the first step. Here are some tips for sticking with a new routine or reinvigorating a tired workout:

  • Set some goals. It’s always a good idea to begin or modify a workout program with a goal in mind. If your primary goal is to reduce stress in your life and recharge your batteries, your specific goals might include committing to walking during your lunch hour three times a week or, if needed, finding a baby sitter to watch your children so that you can slip away to attend a cycling class.
  • Find a friend. Knowing that someone is waiting for you to show up at the gym or the park can be a powerful incentive. Working out with a friend, co-worker or family member often brings a new level of motivation and commitment to your workouts.
  • Change up your routine. If you’ve always been a competitive runner, take a look at other less competitive options that may help with stress reduction, such as Pilates or yoga classes. As an added bonus, these kinder, gentler workouts may enhance your running while also decreasing your stress.

Whatever you do, don’t think of exercise as just one more thing on your to-do list. Find an activity you enjoy — whether it’s an active tennis match or a meditative meander down to a local park and back — and make it part of your regular routine. Any form of physical activity can help you unwind and become an important part of your approach to easing stress.



It’s Fitness Friday, Folks!!

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Fun Fitness: Exercises That Don’t Feel Like Work

Who says fitness has to be deadly dull? There are many activities that will make you break a sweat without longing for the finish line.

Many people believe there’s no such thing as fun fitness. In their minds, a good workout means trudging on a treadmill or lugging weights around a joyless gym, and that there’s no gain without the pain.

Exercises That Don't Feel Like Work

“They think of it as more of a chore, something they have to do because they’ve been told to do it by their doctor or physical therapist,” says Julie Ann McCarthy, a physical therapist in San Francisco and a spokeswoman for the American Physical Therapy Association.

This, of course, is nonsense. There are many ways to combine fun and fitness.

Fun Fitness: Let’s Count the Ways

// Activities that fall under the fun fitness umbrella include:

  • Competitive sports. “A lot of guys come in and say, ‘I don’t like exercising, but I like playing basketball,’” McCarthy says. “The camaraderie and the group setting help you have fun and forget you’re working your heart and lungs.” Soccer, tennis, and racquetball are other competitive sports that can help improve your fitness. Some gyms are even offering competitive dodge ball as a fun game to get your heart pumping.
  • Outdoor activities. Walking, jogging, bicycling, and swimming can get you out in fresh air and sunshine, making your fitness workout feel less like work and more like play. “I usually tell people to start with a run-walk program with a friend,” McCarthy says. “You can slowly build yourself up so you’re running more and walking less.” Other options include kayaking, hiking, inline skating, and skateboarding.
  • Martial arts. Classes that teach karate, jujitsu, judo, tae kwon do, or kickboxing provide a workout aimed at improving your fitness, coordination, and mental discipline.
  • Dance classes. Energetic ballroom dancing is considered a vigorous workout by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine. Dance styles like the salsa, meringue, and mambo can keep you whirling and twirling so much you forget you’re actually getting into shape.
  • Acrobatics. Activities like tumbling, headstands, and somersaults can condition your body and help you feel like a kid again. You can use a balance beam, rings, or just a padded floor. Bouncing on a trampoline is another type of acrobatic fitness fun. Just be careful — these activities can lead to injury if your form is off or you lose your balance.
  • Kid stuff. Don’t discount the fitness to be had in kids’ activities like jumping rope or riding a pogo stick. For example, jumping rope improves your balance, stamina, and coordination, while working muscle groups in your arms, legs, chest, back, shoulders, and abdomen.
  • Nintendo Wii. The venerable video game maker upped the fun factor for fitness when it released its Wii Fit game. Other game makers have followed suit with more video workouts involving the Wii. “It’s a good place to start,” McCarthy says. “If it gets people up and moving, that’s great, and hopefully it will escalate into more intense exercise.”

 

You can make any fitness activity more fun by recruiting a workout buddy or joining a group. Nearly every town has a jogging or bicycle club in which you can take part. “People are more motivated when they’re held accountable by someone else,” McCarthy says. “It’s also more fun when you have company.”

Another way to curtail fitness boredom is to mix up your activities. “With any exercise, your body adapts,” McCarthy says. “It’s important to change your routine so you don’t plateau.”

This article is brought to you by :  http://www.everydayhealth.com/health-report/diet-and-fitness/exercises.aspx



Tasty Tuesdays: Summer Edamame Salad

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Looking for a great, healthy and easy summer recipe?  Try out one of our favorites from the kitchen of our Executive Director, Erica Harvey (she always is talking about this salad that she makes!!)

1 Package steamed/shelled edamame

1 Can rinsed dark red kidney beans

1 Can rinsed/drained garbanzo beans

1/4 cup of chopped cilantro

1/4 cup of chopped red onion

1/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil

1/2 cup lime juice

Dash of salt

Zest of a lime

Mix all ingredients together and let sit overnight (stirring a few times too).  SO delish and high in protein, fiber and great nutrients!