10 Ways to Get Your Daily Vitamin D

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Here at The Breast Cancer Charities of America, we love to educate on breast cancer prevention. One fact that we tell women is researchers have found that women, who are vitamin D deficient, have a 222% increased risk for developing breast cancer.  It’s important to get your daily dose of vitamin D, so here are 10 ways to do just that!

11. Sunlight

Sunlight spurs the body to make vitamin D. But because of the skin-cancer risk, there isn’t an official recommendation to catch some rays. However, a small amount of sun exposure without sunscreen can do the trick.

“If you’re going to get it from the sun, about 20 to 25 minutes of exposure is helpful,” says Stephen Honig, MD, director of the Osteoporosis Center at the Hospital for Joint Diseases, in New York City. The sun is less likely to provide your daily needs at higher latitudes, in the winter, or if you’re older or dark skinned (skin pigment blocks light and the process is less efficient with age). And FYI: Light through a window won’t work.

22. Fatty fish

Fatty fish can be a good source of vitamin D. Common options include salmon, trout, mackerel, tuna, and eel. 

A 3-ounce sockeye salmon fillet contains about 450 international units (IUs) of vitamin D—a good portion of the 600 IUs that is the Institute of Medicine’s recommended dietary allowance (800 IUs if you’re over 70). 

And you get a bonus—heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids!

33. Canned tuna fish

Fresh fish aren’t the only way to boost your vitamin D intake; you can get vitamin D from a can, too. 

Canned tuna fish and canned sardines both contain vitamin D, and are usually less expensive than fresh fish. 

Plus, a longer shelf life makes the canned products easy to stock up on and use at your leisure. Canned light tuna has the most vitamin D—about 150 IUs per 4 ounces—while canned albacore tuna has about 50 IUs per 4 ounces, and canned sardines have a little more than 40 IUs per two sardines.

44. Certain mushrooms

Just like humans, mushrooms have the capacity to produce vitamin D when exposed to ultraviolet light. 

Mushrooms, however, are usually grown in the dark and don’t contain the vitamin. Specific brands, however, are grown in ultraviolet light to spur vitamin D production. 

Check to see if vitamin D–rich ‘shrooms, like Dole’s Portobello Mushrooms, are available at a store near you. They’re perfect for vegetarians looking for plant-based foods that contain the vitamin. Dole’s portobellos will give you 400 IUs of vitamin D per 3-ounce serving (about 1 cup of diced mushrooms).

55. Fortified milk

Almost all types of cow’s milk in the U.S. are fortified with vitamin D, but ice cream and cheese are not. 

In general, an 8-ounce glass of milk contains at least 100 IUs of vitamin D, and a 6-ounce serving of yogurt contains 80 IUs, but the amount can be higher (or lower) depending on how much is added.

Some soy and rice milks are fortified with about the same amount, but check the label since not all contain vitamin D.

66. Some types of orange juice

Not a dairy fan? No problem. You can get vitamin D from fortified orange juice. 

One 8-ounce glass of fortified juice usually has around 100 IUs of vitamin D, but the amount varies from brand to brand. Not all brands are fortified, so check the label. 

Two fortified brands, Florida Natural Orange Juice and Minute Maid Kids+ Orange Juice, contain 100 IUs per 8-ounce serving.

77. Supplements

Vitamin D supplements can help you get your proper daily dose, and as Dr. Honig points out, you don’t run into the issue of skin cancer as you might with UV rays. “And it’s not like calcium,” he says. “You don’t have to split up your vitamin D dose; you can take it all at one time.” 

Too much vitamin D can be toxic, however. The IOM sets the upper limit at 4,000 IUs for people aged 9 and older. That includes all sources—food, sun, and supplements. 

Talk to your doctor before choosing a dosage.

88. Egg Yolks

Eggs are a convenient way to get vitamin D. They’re popular in many breakfast, lunch, dinner, and dessert recipes. Since the vitamin D in an egg comes from its yolk, it’s important to use the whole egg—not just the whites. One yolk will give you about 40 IUs, but don’t try to get your daily vitamin D just from eggs. One egg contains about 200 milligrams of cholesterol, and the American Heart Association recommends consuming no more than 300 milligrams a day for heart health.

99. Fortified Cereal

If you’re a vitamin D seeker looking for a crunch, look no further than fortified cereals. Choose a low-calorie fortified cereal like Multi Grain Cheerios to get part of your daily fill of vitamin D. You can pair it with fortified milk and a glass of fortified OJ too. A 1-cup (29 gram) serving of Multi Grain Cheerios with one-half cup of fortified milk is 90 IUs; add in an 8-ounce glass of fortified orange juice, and your total is close to 200 IUs.

1010. Cod Liver Oil

While its name might suggest a less-than-savory flavor, cod liver oil is often flavored with mint or citrus, or comes in capsule form. One tablespoon contains about 1,300 IUs of vitamin D, which is more than twice the recommended dietary allowance of 600 IUs per day. That amount doesn’t exceed the maximum upper-level intake of 4,000 IUs for people over 8 years old, but it exceeds the daily maximum for infants (1,000 IUs).           Read the original article by Ella Quittner here!



PRESS Forward Against Breast Cancer

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Breast Cancer Charities of America (BCCA) exists for one reason—to eliminate breast cancer as a life-threatening disease.  Our central focus is on educating, empowering and encouraging all women to become pro-active in preventing breast cancer and, if diagnosed, in surviving breast cancer.

We offer leading edge, state-of-the-art, research-backed programs that focus on all that women can do in addition to medical care.  Our services include nutrition, exercise, and social support all the while defusing the fear that often accompanies breast cancer.  And we provide help now with emergency financial assistance to medicines and medical supplies to women in poverty.

Join Breast Cancer Charities as we P-R-E-S-S Forward in the fight against breast cancer….

Prevention

Studies show that 8 of 10 breast cancers can be prevented.   Prevention—not just early detection.  Breast cancer prevention is the new frontier.  Excellent studies show that prevention is possible.  We lead the way with our Vitamin D Promise program.

Research

Though the “New Era Cancer Research Fund” we underwrite less-toxic, minimally-invasive diagnosis and treatment options.  This includes research on topics such as the link between Vitamin D and a reduction in cancer; how food choices impact your body during treatment and studies on Proton Therapy as a first-line treatment.

Education

Education is power in preventing and surviving breast cancer.  From teaching breast self exams to wise exercise, from managing post-treatment side-effects to mobilizing the mind for healing, we guide and support women to actively participate in health and healing.  Our University Education Program teaches students the lifestyle choices they can make at an early age to prevent breast cancer.

Survival

BCCA’s integrated cancer care program supports and complements conventional medical treatment.  The program encompasses the whole person—body, mind and spirit.  While accomplished in addition to conventional medical care, we understand it takes more than medicine to get well and stay well.

Support

When breast cancer strikes, it impacts the entire family and all areas of their life, especially financially.  We have designed our Help Now Fund to assist with the basic needs of cancer patients in need.  The demand is huge and we limit our funding to past-due rents and utilities.  Our commitment: no woman will go through breast cancer without a roof over her head and the basics of daily needs.

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We PRESS Forward in the fight against breast cancer.  We inspire hope.  We nurture healing.  We renew life.

The Breast Cancer Charities of America.  We are the new voice of breast cancer.  We are passionate, filled with energy and a vision.  And we will not stop until breast cancer is no longer a life-threatening disease.

Join us.  Make your voice heard.  It’s a new day in the world of breast cancer.



Wellness Wednesday: 7 Ways To Prevent Breast Cancer

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By Brandi Koskie and Jason Knapfel – DietsInReview.com

Provided by www.shine.com

There are a number of ways you can be an active part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, including wearing a pink ribbon, participating in events, or making a donation to a related organization. However, it can be an even better idea to take steps that allow you to prevent the disease that will affect one in eight women. There are several steps you can take to avoid being a statistic, and instead a survivor, or someone who has never had to face it. The most obvious of which is minding your diet. We all know that a balanced and nutritious diet has a wealth of benefits, and counting breast cancer prevention as one is pretty positive. Here are 7 strategies for preventing breast cancer that you can start implementing today.

1. Eat more produce. Fruits and vegetables contain antioxidants that help protect against all forms of cancer.

2. Reduce fat consumption. Studies on dietary fat have been conflicting, but most experts say it’s still wise to steer clear of saturated fat.

3. Get plenty of calcium and vitamin D. A 10-year Harvard study found that pre-menopausal women who got 1,366 milligrams of calcium and 548 IU of vitamin D daily slashed their risk of breast cancer by one-third, and their odds of getting invasive breast cancer by up to 69 percent.

4. Add flaxseed to cereal. Flaxseed is a good source of lignans, compounds that may play a role in preventing estrogen-dependent cancers by inhibiting the development of tumors or slowing their growth rate.

5. Keep barbecue to a minimum. A recent study showed that post-menopausal women who had consumed a lot of barbecued and smoked red meat or chicken over their lifetimes had a greater risk of developing breast cancer.

6. Moderate alcohol intake. More than one drink each day increases your odds of developing breast cancer.

7. Fill up on fiber. A diet that’s rich in fiber (30-plus grams a day) can reduce the risk of breast cancer among pre-menopausal women in half. It’s also important to live an active lifestyle. Yoga, moderate weight lifting, walking, and running are all ways to keep your body moving, your heart rate up, and fend-off this pesky disease.

One of the most important behaviors you can start practicing for yourself is regular breast self-exams and annual visits with your doctor for manual exams. You should also learn, based on your history and risk factors, when the right time is to begin regular mammograms.