Wellness Wednesday: Fall Fitness Tips

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Seriously, what’s not to love about fall? Pumpkin lattes are back, you can dig out your favorite sweaters, and sweet potatoes are finally in season. Best of all, the crisp temps make fall the perfect time to exercise outdoors: “The cool weather allows you to enjoy yourself without having to worry about being overheated or too cold,” says Terri Walsh, celebrity trainer and creator of the Active Resistance Training Method (A.R.T.). And that means you’re more likely to feel awesome during your workout, and maybe even log an extra mile or climb another trail.

But before you lace up and head outside, prepare for your outdoor adventure with Walsh’s fall weather workout tips:

Wear Layers
It may feel slightly nippy at first, but the weather has a rep for changing on a moment’s notice. Dress in layers that you can easily remove if your body starts to heat up—or put back on if you get cold, says Walsh.

Stay Hydrated
Many people forget to drink enough fluids during fall workouts because it’s not super hot, says Walsh. Not good. Keep drinking as normal to avoid dehydration. While it’s good to carry water, you can add some flavor with a bit of fruit juice to get even more nutrients.

Pack Snacks
Don’t disrupt your outing for a food pit stop. If you’ll be out most of the day hiking or biking, Walsh recommends bringing a small backpack with nuts or fruit stashed inside. No matter where you are, at least you have a constant source of fuel.

And if you think running is the only outdoor exercise to try, it’s time to get creative! If you’re near some branches and a log, you’ll definitely want to try this off-the-beaten-trail circuit workout. But if a park is your only outdoor fitness center, find a jungle gym and do these fun exercises on the playground. The kids in line for the monkey bars can wait their turn.

 

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/fitness/fall-workout-exercise-tips



Fitness Friday

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Fitness Friday

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I don’t know about y’all, but my midsection is my ‘trouble” area. No matter what I do I have an unsightly belly bulge that seems to double in size during the Fall and Winter. Well this year I have come up with a plan…I like to call it my version of ” Battle of the Bulge”. I am going to start working my midsection out like there is no tomorrow! I am going to get it as toned as possible before Thanksgiving, Christmas and cold. That way when the inevitable bathing suit season rolls around my bulge will just be the size that it normally is, and not double. I think this is a pretty genius plan.

 Here are a few great ab exercises that I found on the interweb for those of you that want to jump on to my ” Battle of the Bulge” plan. These exercises were brought to you by: http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1366183/four_great_exercises_to_tone_your_midsection_pg2.html?cat=50

1. Lower Leg Raises with two variations:

Lay flat on your back with your legs extended straight out in front of you. Place your arms with your palms face-down. Keeping your back pressed flat into the floor, lift both of your legs about six inches off of the ground. For beginners, simply do two sets of twenty leg raises. If you feel you are a bit more advanced, when you raise your legs, spread them about two feet apart then bring them back together before setting them back on the floor and do two sets of twenty of these. These exercise target the lower abdominal and also, as the advanced variations increase in difficulty, your middle abdominal area.

2. Yoga Frog Lifts

This one is my personal favorite. Lay on the floor on your back with your hands behind your head. Now, spread your legs slightly and press the bottoms of your feet together; it should look as if you are doing a

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 plié while lying down, yet your feet are together “frog style.” Then carefully lift both your upper body and lower body about 6 inches off the floor using your abdominal muscles to support you, hold for two seconds and then lower your upper and lower body back to the floor. This will be a bit uncomfortable at first, but start off with three sets of fifteen of these. It may sound like an awkward number, but this is a great exercise and starting off at fifteen yields the most results and is much easier to handle than it appears. This exercise targets the middle and lower abdominals, and, if you feel you can advance, target your upper abdominals by alternating lifting your lower body, then your upper body, lifting each a bit higher than you would have when lifting both simultaneously; make sure you lift each part in two sets of fifteen.

3. Side Lifts

I love this exercise because of what an easy exercise it is. Stand upright with your feet separated about should-width apart. Hold a 10 pound weight in your left hand letting it rest at your side and place your right hand on your right hip; this helps stabilize your position, making your stance sturdier. Very slowly, still holding the weight in your left hand, bend to your left side (without bending your knees). Hold this position for 3-5 seconds and then, using your abdominal muscles by tightening them, pull your body upright again. Repeat this between ten and fifteen times for beginners; for more advanced exercises, fifteen and twenty times. Switch the weight to your right hand, put your left hand on your left hip and repeat on your right side. This targets your oblique muscles.

4. Criss-Cross

This is a fairly well-known exercise that targets your upper and mid abdominals as well as your obliques. Lay flat on the floor with your legs bent very slightly at the knee and your hands resting behind your head as if you were doing sit ups. Now, lift and twist your upper body, bringing your left elbow forward as if you were doing a sideways sit-up. At the same time, draw your right knee up and in towards your chest until it meets your left elbow and extend your left leg out, hovering between 6 inches and 2 feet off the ground (depending upon your advancement level and flexibility). Switch sides and repeat in a fluid motion between twenty and thirty times. If you can, do two sets of these per exercise session. Spreading them out is fine, and it occasionally helps if you place a pillow beneath your lower back.



Fitness Friday

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Are you stressed and looking for a way to relax?  Here is a great article about exercise and stress brought to you by www.mayoclinic.com

Exercise and stress: Get moving to combat stress

One way to take control of the stress in your life is through physical activity. Being active can boost your feel-good endorphins and distract you from daily worries.

By Mayo Clinic staff

You know that exercise does your body good, but you’re too busy and stressed to fit it into your routine. Hold on a second — there’s good news when it comes to exercise and stress.

Virtually any form of exercise, from aerobics to weightlifting, can act as a stress reliever. If you’re not an athlete or even if you’re downright out of shape, you can still make a little exercise go a long way toward stress management. Discover the connection between exercise and stress relief — and why exercise should be part of your stress management plan.

Exercise and stress relief

Exercise increases your overall health and your sense of well-being, which puts more pep in your step every day. But exercise also has some direct stress-busting benefits.

  • It pumps up your endorphins. Physical activity helps to bump up the production of your brain’s feel-good neurotransmitters, called endorphins. Although this function is often referred to as a runner’s high, a rousing game of tennis or a nature hike also can contribute to this same feeling.
  • It’s meditation in motion. After a fast-paced game of racquetball or several laps in the pool, you’ll often find that you’ve forgotten the day’s irritations and concentrated only on your body’s movements. As you begin to regularly shed your daily tensions through movement and physical activity, you may find that this focus on a single task, and the resulting energy and optimism, can help you remain calm and clear in everything that you do.
  • It improves your mood. Regular exercise can increase self-confidence and lower the symptoms associated with mild depression and anxiety. Exercise also can improve your sleep, which is often disrupted by stress, depression and anxiety. All this can ease your stress levels and give you a sense of command over your body and your life.

Put exercise and stress relief to work for you

A successful exercise program begins with a few simple steps.

  • Consult with your doctor. Begin any new fitness program by consulting with your health care professional, especially if you have any medical conditions or are obese.
  • Walk before you run. Build up your fitness level gradually. Excitement about a new program can lead to overdoing it and possibly even injury. Plus, if you begin your program slowly, chances are better you’ll stick with it. If you’re new to exercise, aim for about 20 to 30 minutes of exercise three to four days a week and increase gradually. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends getting at least two hours and 30 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity (think brisk walking or swimming) or one hour and 15 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity (such as running) — preferably spread throughout the week. It also recommends strength training exercises at least twice a week.
  • Do what you love, and love what you do. Don’t train for a marathon if you dislike running. Virtually any form of exercise or movement can increase your fitness level while decreasing your stress. The most important thing is to pick an activity that you enjoy. Examples include walking, stair climbing, jogging, bicycling, yoga, tai chi, gardening, weightlifting and swimming.
  • Pencil it in. Although your schedule may necessitate a morning workout one day and an evening activity the next, carving out some time to move every day helps you make your exercise program an ongoing priority.

Sticking with it

Starting an exercise program is just the first step. Here are some tips for sticking with a new routine or reinvigorating a tired workout:

  • Set some goals. It’s always a good idea to begin or modify a workout program with a goal in mind. If your primary goal is to reduce stress in your life and recharge your batteries, your specific goals might include committing to walking during your lunch hour three times a week or, if needed, finding a baby sitter to watch your children so that you can slip away to attend a cycling class.
  • Find a friend. Knowing that someone is waiting for you to show up at the gym or the park can be a powerful incentive. Working out with a friend, co-worker or family member often brings a new level of motivation and commitment to your workouts.
  • Change up your routine. If you’ve always been a competitive runner, take a look at other less competitive options that may help with stress reduction, such as Pilates or yoga classes. As an added bonus, these kinder, gentler workouts may enhance your running while also decreasing your stress.

Whatever you do, don’t think of exercise as just one more thing on your to-do list. Find an activity you enjoy — whether it’s an active tennis match or a meditative meander down to a local park and back — and make it part of your regular routine. Any form of physical activity can help you unwind and become an important part of your approach to easing stress.



Wellness Wednesday: Yoga improves sleep for cancer survivors

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ROCHESTER, N.Y., May 21 (UPI) — Cancer survivors who tried four weeks of gentle yoga improved the quality of their sleep and were not as tired during the day, researchers in New York said.

They also used fewer sleeping pills and rated their quality of life more highly than cancer survivors who didn’t take yoga, said researcher Karen Mustian of the University of Rochester Cancer Center.

Researchers randomly assigned 410 patients to receive either their usual follow-up care after medical treatments or attend a 75-minute yoga class, twice a week. The average age of the patient was 54 and about three-quarters of the group had been treated for breast cancer.

After four weeks, thehttp://www.upi.comsurvivors who took yoga reported fewer sleep problems and less fatigue.

It was not clear whether more strenuous forms of yoga would provide the same results, said Mustian, who is to present her findings at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual meeting in Chicago next month.

Provided By: http://www.upi.com



Fitness Friday: Exercise Helps Battle Effects of Cancer Treatments!

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Here are two studies that blow traditional theories of how to treat and recover from cancer out of the water.
Rather than rest, aerobic exercise and strength training have emerged as the keys to reducing the pain and fatigue that accompany the treatment of cancer.
A six-week study of 32 patients rehabilitating from high-dose chemotherapy concluded that those who walked on a treadmill exhibited both higher hemoglobin concentration and maximum physical performance.
And none of the 16 patients who walked regularly reported feeling fatigued during their daily activities as compared to 25 percent of those who remained sedentary.
A second study of 20 cancer patients who had recently undergone chemotherapy examined their responses to a program of aerobic exercise and strength and flexibility training.
After 10 weeks, average strength increased by 43 percent and the time patients were able to spend on the aerobic machines nearly doubled.
The benefits of exercise extended beyond physical measurements. When questioned about their quality of life, participants noted improvements in all psychological areas as well as a reduced perception of pain.
According to James Sallis, Ph.D., professor of psychology at San Diego State University, ”Patients and healthcare providers should be interested in adding physical activity to the treatment regimen as a means of improving quality of life.’’
Let’s hope they are.
Sources: Cancer, September 1997 ; Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, January 1998
Provided by: www.acefitness.org



It is Wellness Wednesday: Soy Food Linked to Decreased Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death

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Article courtesy of http://www.newswise.com

Newswise — Researchers at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, led by Xiao Ou Shu, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Medicine, have found that a higher intake of soy foods was associated with a lower risk of death and breast cancer recurrence among breast cancer patients in China. The study is published in the December 9 issue of JAMA.

There had been a concern that soy foods could have an adverse effect on outcomes among breast cancer patients.

“Soy foods are rich in isoflavones, a major group of phytoestrogens that have been hypothesized to reduce the risk of breast cancer. However, the estrogen-like effect of isoflavones and the potential interaction between isoflavones and tamoxifen have led to concern about soy food consumption among breast cancer patients,” the authors write.

Tamoxifen, which is designed to block estrogen, is a widely used treatment for breast cancer patients.

Shu and her colleagues analyzed data from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study, a large, population-based study of 5,042 female breast cancer survivors in China, which Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the Shanghai Institute of Preventive Medicine have carried out since 2001.

Women ages 20 to 75 years, diagnosed between March 2002 and April 2006, were studied through June 2009. Trained interviewers using structured questionnaires asked the women about demographic characteristics, reproductive and disease history, medication use, diet, lifestyle factors and use of complementary and alternative medicine.

Researchers used a food frequency questionnaire designed to measure soy foods commonly consumed in Shanghai, including tofu, soy milk, fresh soy beans and other soy products, as well as meat, fish and cruciferous vegetables.

After a median follow-up of 3.9 years, there were 444 total deaths and 534 breast cancer recurrences in the study group. Soy food consumption after cancer diagnosis, measured as soy protein intake, was inversely associated with mortality and recurrence. The associations of soy protein/isoflavones intake with mortality and recurrence appear to follow a dose-response pattern until soy protein intake reaches 11 grams per day or soy isoflavones intake reaches 40 mg/day. After these points, the association appears to level off or rebound.

“We found that women in the highest soy food intake groups had the lowest mortality and recurrence rates rate compared with women in the lowest soy food intake group, regardless of tamoxifen use status,” said Shu.

The associations of soy food intake with mortality and recurrence were observed for women with either ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer. The association between soy food intake and overall mortality did not appear to vary by menopausal status.

“It is important to note that we studied soy food intake and not the use of soy capsule supplements,” explained Shu. “These capsules frequently contain only soy isoflavones, while soy foods contain other nutrients, as well. So we cannot infer that the isoflavones alone would provide the same protective benefits.”

Soy isoflavones compete with estrogens in the binding of estrogen receptors, reduce estrogen synthesis and help clear steroids from the body. These anti-estrogenic effects may be one of the underlying mechanisms through which soy foods are associated with better breast cancer outcomes. Other constituents of soy foods, such as folate, protein, protease inhibitors, calcium or fiber, also may be responsible for the survival benefits of soy food consumption.

The study was supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program and the National Cancer Institute.

Newswise — Researchers at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, led by Xiao Ou Shu, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Medicine, have found that a higher intake of soy foods was associated with a lower risk of death and breast cancer recurrence among breast cancer patients in China. The study is published in the December 9 issue of JAMA.

There had been a concern that soy foods could have an adverse effect on outcomes among breast cancer patients.

“Soy foods are rich in isoflavones, a major group of phytoestrogens that have been hypothesized to reduce the risk of breast cancer. However, the estrogen-like effect of isoflavones and the potential interaction between isoflavones and tamoxifen have led to concern about soy food consumption among breast cancer patients,” the authors write.

Tamoxifen, which is designed to block estrogen, is a widely used treatment for breast cancer patients.

Shu and her colleagues analyzed data from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study, a large, population-based study of 5,042 female breast cancer survivors in China, which Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the Shanghai Institute of Preventive Medicine have carried out since 2001.

Women ages 20 to 75 years, diagnosed between March 2002 and April 2006, were studied through June 2009. Trained interviewers using structured questionnaires asked the women about demographic characteristics, reproductive and disease history, medication use, diet, lifestyle factors and use of complementary and alternative medicine.

Researchers used a food frequency questionnaire designed to measure soy foods commonly consumed in Shanghai, including tofu, soy milk, fresh soy beans and other soy products, as well as meat, fish and cruciferous vegetables.

After a median follow-up of 3.9 years, there were 444 total deaths and 534 breast cancer recurrences in the study group. Soy food consumption after cancer diagnosis, measured as soy protein intake, was inversely associated with mortality and recurrence. The associations of soy protein/isoflavones intake with mortality and recurrence appear to follow a dose-response pattern until soy protein intake reaches 11 grams per day or soy isoflavones intake reaches 40 mg/day. After these points, the association appears to level off or rebound.

“We found that women in the highest soy food intake groups had the lowest mortality and recurrence rates rate compared with women in the lowest soy food intake group, regardless of tamoxifen use status,” said Shu.

The associations of soy food intake with mortality and recurrence were observed for women with either ER-positive or ER-negative breast cancer. The association between soy food intake and overall mortality did not appear to vary by menopausal status.

“It is important to note that we studied soy food intake and not the use of soy capsule supplements,” explained Shu. “These capsules frequently contain only soy isoflavones, while soy foods contain other nutrients, as well. So we cannot infer that the isoflavones alone would provide the same protective benefits.”

Soy isoflavones compete with estrogens in the binding of estrogen receptors, reduce estrogen synthesis and help clear steroids from the body. These anti-estrogenic effects may be one of the underlying mechanisms through which soy foods are associated with better breast cancer outcomes. Other constituents of soy foods, such as folate, protein, protease inhibitors, calcium or fiber, also may be responsible for the survival benefits of soy food consumption.

The study was supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program and the National Cancer Institute.



Think Pink Tip of the Week…Tips To Help Fight Breast Cancer

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One in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer. Most women know of someone who has been affected by this disease and wonder what can they do to protect themselves from breast cancer. A new analysis study found 40% of all cases of breast cancer could be prevented with lifestyle changes.

The study, from the research groups American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund, is the largest review of research examining lifestyle and breast cancer; the groups analyzed nearly 1,000 studies. The study found that lifestyle changes concerning certain risk factors may help prevent breast cancer. The best advice today to help lower the risk of breast cancer is to maintain a healthy body weight, especially after menopause.

Other recommendations from the study include: eat healthy foods, limit or avoid alcohol, exercise and breastfeed your baby.

Healthy Foods: Eat more foods which may be linked to helping prevent breast cancer, including more fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains. Fill two-thirds of your plate with plant-based foods – fruits, vegetables, whole grains and beans. Include whole grains, canned tomato products such as pasta sauce, and cruciferous vegetables (including cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower) often as these foods may offer a protective effect against breast cancer.

Move More: Women should get 30 minutes of exercise or physical activity each day. According to the National Cancer Institute, women can reduce their risk of dying from breast cancer by 25% with exercise.

Limit Alcohol: Women should limit their alcohol consumption to no more than one drink each day or avoid it all together.

Breastfeed Baby: There is convincing evidence that breastfeeding lowers breast cancer risk.

Remember – monthly breast exams and annual mammograms are important for early diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

Here are some great tips from: http://www.hy-vee.com/health/healthy-bites/think-pink-tips.aspx



Wellness Wednesday: A healthy diet may trim breast cancer risk

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NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – A woman may not be able to change her family history of breast cancer, but she can typically control what she eats and drinks. And consuming more vegetables and whole grains — and less alcohol — just might trim her chances of getting the disease, according to an analysis of published studies.

HEALTH

“As the incidence of breast cancer continues to rise, with many of the risk factors for the disease non-modifiable, potentially modifiable risk factors such as diet are of interest,” Dr. Sarah Brennan of Queen’s University Belfast in Northern Ireland, who led the analysis, noted in an email to Reuters Health.

It’s estimated that more than 120 out of every 100,000 American women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, yielding a lifetime risk of about 1 in 8. The idea that diet might influence these numbers is not new; yet solid evidence for such a link has remained elusive.

“Even though we have hypothesized a relationship between diet and the risk of breast cancer, showing it has been very hard to do,” Dr. Michelle Holmes, an epidemiologist at Harvard Medical School in Boston who was not involved in the study, told Reuters Health. Individual studies are often too small to uncover modest relationships; combining them, however, offers a better chance of detecting a diet’s true effects.

After carefully reviewing the relevant research to date, Brennan and her colleagues pooled the results of 18 studies that enrolled a total of more than 400,000 people. Each study aimed to associate breast cancer risks with at least one common dietary pattern: the “unhealthy” Western diet (high in red meats and refined grains), a more prudent “healthy” diet (high in fruits, vegetables and whole grains), or varying levels of alcohol drinking.

Since foods and beverages are never consumed in isolation, this more holistic view of intake better reflects a person’s diet than looking at particular nutrients, Brennan and her colleagues explain in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The team found an 11 percent lower risk of breast cancer among women in the highest versus lowest categories of the prudent diet, while those consuming larger amounts of wine, beer and spirits had a 21 percent increased risk — a relationship that has been highlighted in many previous studies. Surprisingly, no overall risk difference was seen between high and low categories of the Western diet.

Just how a healthy diet might lower breast cancer risk is not well understood. Alcohol’s link, on the other hand, is generally known: Estrogen levels are higher in postmenopausal women who drink alcohol, noted Holmes. And a higher lifetime exposure to estrogen has been tentatively linked to the disease.

Brennan stressed that these findings need to be interpreted cautiously, noting that there are inherent statistical problems in combining the results of multiple studies, in addition to the limitations of each included study, such as recall bias. She pointed to the need for more carefully designed studies in the future to further examine the diet-breast cancer link.

In the meantime, Holmes said: “Consuming a prudent, healthy diet that includes lots of fruits, vegetables and whole grains is a wise idea, because there is lots of scientific evidence that it prevents heart disease and diabetes. This study shows that an additional benefit might be a small decrease in breast cancer risk.”

SOURCE: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, March 10, 2010



Think Pink Tip of the Week: Experts: One-third of breast cancer is avoidable.

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BARCELONA, Spain – Up to a third of breast cancer cases in Western countries could be avoided if women ate less and exercised more, researchers at a breast cancer conference said Thursday — comments that could ignite heated discussions among victims and advocates.

While better treatments, early diagnosis and mammogram screenings have dramatically slowed the disease, experts said the focus should now shift to changing behaviors like diet and physical activity.
“What can be achieved with screening has been achieved. We can’t do much more,” Carlo La Vecchia, head of epidemiology at the University of Milan, told The Associated Press. “It’s time to move onto other things.”
La Vecchia spoke Thursday on the influence of lifestyle factors at a European breast cancer conference in Barcelona.
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. In Europe, there were about 421,000 new cases and nearly 90,000 deaths in 2008, the latest available figures. The United States last year saw more than 190,000 new cases and 40,000 deaths. A woman’s lifetime chance of getting breast cancer is about one in eight.
Many breast cancers are fueled by estrogen, a hormone produced in fat tissue. So experts suspect that the fatter a woman is, the more estrogen she’s likely to produce, which could in turn spark breast cancer. Even in slim women, exercise can help reduce the cancer risk by converting more of the body’s fat into muscle.
Any discussion of weight and breast cancer is a politically sensitive topic, for some may misconstrue that as the medical establishment blaming victims for getting breast cancer. Victims themselves could also feel guilty, wondering just how much a factor weight played in their getting the disease.
Ian Manley, a spokesman for Breast Cancer Care, a British charity, said his agency has always been very careful about issuing similar lifestyle advice.
“We would never want women to feel responsible for their breast cancer,” he said. “It’s a complex disease and there are so many factors responsible that it’s difficult to blame it on one specific issue.”
La Vecchia cited figures from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, which estimated that 25 to 30 percent of breast cancer cases could be avoided if women were thinner and exercised more.
That means staying slim and never becoming overweight in the first place. Robert Baan, an IARC cancer expert, said it wasn’t clear if women who lose weight have a lower cancer risk or if the damage was already done from when they were heavy.
Drinking less alcohol could also help. Experts estimate that having more than a couple of drinks a day can boost a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer by four to 10 percent.
After studies several years ago linked hormone replacement therapy to cancer, millions of women abandoned the treatment, leading to a sharp drop in breast cancer rates. Experts said a similar reduction might be seen if women ate better — consuming less fat and more vegetables — and exercised more.
Michelle Holmes, a cancer expert at Harvard University, said changing things like diet and nutrition is arguably easier than tackling other breast cancer risk factors.
“Women who have early pregnancies are protected against breast cancer, but teenage pregnancy is a social disaster so it’s not something we want to encourage,” she said in a phone interview from Cambridge, Massachusetts. “But there’s no downside to reducing obesity and increasing physical activity.”
She also said people may mistakenly think their chances of getting cancer are more dependent on their genes than their lifestyle.
“The genes have been there for thousands of years, but if cancer rates are changing in a lifetime, that doesn’t have much to do with genes,” she said.
In the 1980s and 1990s, breast cancer rates steadily increased, in parallel with the rise in obesity and the use of hormone replacement therapy, which involves estrogen.
La Vecchia said countries like Italy and France — where obesity rates have been stable for the past two decades — show that weight can be controlled at a population level.
“It’s hard to lose weight, but it’s not impossible,” he said. “The potential benefit of preventing cancer is worth it.”

Provided by: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100325/ap_on_he_me/eu_med_avoiding_breast_cancer